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Question on TSBD (research)

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Question on TSBD (research)

Post by greg parker on Sat 20 Sep 2014, 11:13 am

According to Wiki (using a McAdams' underling as a source) Harold Byrd purchased the building at 411 Elm at public auction on July 4, 1939. This is Independence Day, no?

Out of idle curiosity, I checked the wiki entry on Independence Day and it says 


  • In 1870, the U.S. Congress made Independence Day an unpaid holiday for federal employees. 
  • In 1938, Congress changed Independence Day to a paid federal holiday.


So my question is - how likely is it that a public auction would be held on a federal public holiday - especially one as revered as this?

_________________
Mixing Pop and Politics he asks me what the use is
I offer him embarrassment and my usual excuses
While looking down the corridor
Out to where the van is waiting
I'm looking for the Great Leap Forward

            Billy Bragg
-----------------------------
 Australians don't mind criminals: It's successful bullshit artists we despise. 
             Lachie Hulme            
-----------------------------
The Cold War ran on bullshit.
              Me

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Re: Question on TSBD (research)

Post by Stan Dane on Sat 20 Sep 2014, 12:14 pm

I would say no, it was not likely that they held a public auction on a federal public holiday, especially this one. The 4th of July was always a big deal when I was growing up.
 
I found this blurb at the Library of Congress website of an interview in 1938: http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/today/jul04.html

By the 1870s, the Fourth of July was the most important secular holiday on the calendar. Congress passed a law making Independence Day a federal holiday on June 28, 1870. Even far-flung communities on the western frontier managed to congregate on Independence Day. In an American Life Histories: Manuscripts from the Federal Writers' Project, 1936-1940 interview, Miss Nettie Spencer remembered the Fourth as the "big event of the year. Everyone in the countryside got together on that day for the only time in the year." She continued,
 
The big event of the year was the Fourth of July. Everyone in the countryside got together on that day for the only time in the year. The new babies were shown off, and the new brides who would be exhibiting babies next year. Everyone would load their wagons with all the food they could hawl and come to town early in the morning. On our first big Fourth at Corvallis mother made two hundred gooseberry pies. You can see what an event it was. There would be floats in the morning and the one that got the [girls?] eye was the Goddess of Liberty. She was supposed to be the most wholesome and prettiest girl in the countryside — if she wasn't she had friends who thought she was. But the rest of us weren't always in agreement on that…Following the float would be the Oregon Agricultural College cadets, and some kind of a band. Sometimes there would be political effigies.
 
Just before lunch - and we'd always hold lunch up for an hour - some Senator or lawyer would speak. These speeches always had one pattern. First the speaker would challenge England to a fight and berate the King and say that he was a skunk. This was known as twisting the lion's tail. Then the next theme was that any one could find freedom and liberty on our shores. The speaker would invite those who were heavy laden in other lands to come to us and find peace. The speeches were pretty fiery and by that time the men who drank got into fights and called each other Englishmen. In the afternoon we had what we called the 'plug uglies' — funny floats and clowns who took off on the political subjects of the day…The Fourth was the day of the year that really counted then. Christmas wasn't much; a Church tree or something, but no one twisted the lion's tail.
 
"Rural Life in the 1870s," http://www.loc.gov/collection/federal-writers-project/?q=229080415
Portland, Oregon,
Walker Winslow, interviewer, December 15, 1938.

Apparently, it was a big deal then, too. It's hard to imagine any public business being conducted on the 4th.

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Re: Question on TSBD (research)

Post by greg parker on Sat 20 Sep 2014, 12:46 pm

Thanks Stan -- that's what I figured would be the case. Doesn't really mean anything. I really was just curious.

_________________
Mixing Pop and Politics he asks me what the use is
I offer him embarrassment and my usual excuses
While looking down the corridor
Out to where the van is waiting
I'm looking for the Great Leap Forward

            Billy Bragg
-----------------------------
 Australians don't mind criminals: It's successful bullshit artists we despise. 
             Lachie Hulme            
-----------------------------
The Cold War ran on bullshit.
              Me

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Re: Question on TSBD (research)

Post by Paul Francisco Paso on Sat 20 Sep 2014, 12:55 pm

In 1937 the property was acquired by the Carraway Byrd Corporation, and after the company defaulted on the loan, it was bought at public auction July 4, 1939 by D. Harold Byrd.

Sale of Private Property in a Public auction


Private property may be sold in a public auction for a number of reasons. It may be seized through a governmental process to satisfy a judgment rendered by a court or agency, or to liquidate a mortgage foreclosure, tax lien, or tax sale. Usually, prices obtained at a public auction to satisfy a judgment are distressed - that is, they are much lower than the price which would be obtained for that property if the seller were free to hold out for an optimal time to sell. In the United States, public auctions to satisfy judgments are usually conducted under the authority of the sheriff of the county or city in which the property to be auctioned was seized pursuant to the judgment, and an auction held for such a purpose is also called a Sheriff's sale.

Real property may be subject to a public auction in order to partition the property between joint tenants who can not agree as to how the property should be divided. An estate sale conducted at the direction of a probate court may also be conducted as a public auction.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_auction

Do you reckon a dodgy Sheriff may have had something to do with the auction date falling on July 4?

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Re: Question on TSBD (research)

Post by Stan Dane on Sat 20 Sep 2014, 1:34 pm

Something smells rotten in Denmark.
 
The property was acquired by Carraway Byrd Corporation in 1937...the corporation defaults on the loan...a cat named Byrd buys the property (presumably at steeply discounted "distressed" price) on the 4th of July, 1939.

Nothing to see here...move along.

Sheriffs are usually elected officials and are fairly autonomous, so I reckon a "dodgy" Sheriff might just decide to hold a public auction on a federal holiday if'n he felt like it (fuck those bastard feds anyway) and if'n it might help one of his "supporters" get a property off the public ledger and back into the private sector where it belongs.

Because after all, this is America!

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Re: Question on TSBD (research)

Post by greg parker on Sat 20 Sep 2014, 1:43 pm

Stan Dane wrote:Something smells rotten in Denmark.
 
The property was acquired by Carraway Byrd Corporation in 1937...the corporation defaults on the loan...a cat named Byrd buys the property (presumably at steeply discounted "distressed" price) on the 4th of July, 1939.

Nothing to see here...move along.

Sheriffs are usually elected officials and are fairly autonomous, so I reckon a "dodgy" Sheriff might just decide to hold a public auction on a federal holiday if'n he felt like it (fuck those bastard feds anyway) and if'n it might help one of his "supporters" get a property off the public ledger and back into the private sector where it belongs.

Because after all, this is America!
Stan,

didn't I say (in so many words) that there was nuttin' to see here? But no. You gotta get nosey,

Okay. Yes - it was what we call here a "shonky" deal.

Byrd paid $35,000 for it which =  $582,622.50 in today's dollars given an average annual inflation rate of 3.82%

_________________
Mixing Pop and Politics he asks me what the use is
I offer him embarrassment and my usual excuses
While looking down the corridor
Out to where the van is waiting
I'm looking for the Great Leap Forward

            Billy Bragg
-----------------------------
 Australians don't mind criminals: It's successful bullshit artists we despise. 
             Lachie Hulme            
-----------------------------
The Cold War ran on bullshit.
              Me

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Re: Question on TSBD (research)

Post by Stan Dane on Sat 20 Sep 2014, 2:01 pm

That was quite a feat by Byrd, pulling that off on the 4th. I think he was the inspiration for the 1960s cartoon, the badass known as "Birdman." I get pumped up every time watch this!


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Re: Question on TSBD (research)

Post by greg parker on Sat 20 Sep 2014, 2:17 pm

I remember that show...

_________________
Mixing Pop and Politics he asks me what the use is
I offer him embarrassment and my usual excuses
While looking down the corridor
Out to where the van is waiting
I'm looking for the Great Leap Forward

            Billy Bragg
-----------------------------
 Australians don't mind criminals: It's successful bullshit artists we despise. 
             Lachie Hulme            
-----------------------------
The Cold War ran on bullshit.
              Me

greg parker
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Re: Question on TSBD (research)

Post by greg parker on Sat 20 Sep 2014, 4:01 pm

Hmm.. just discovered Cousin Richard got in on the act...

_________________
Mixing Pop and Politics he asks me what the use is
I offer him embarrassment and my usual excuses
While looking down the corridor
Out to where the van is waiting
I'm looking for the Great Leap Forward

            Billy Bragg
-----------------------------
 Australians don't mind criminals: It's successful bullshit artists we despise. 
             Lachie Hulme            
-----------------------------
The Cold War ran on bullshit.
              Me

greg parker
Admin

Posts : 3448
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Re: Question on TSBD (research)

Post by Paul Francisco Paso on Sat 20 Sep 2014, 4:47 pm

It seems like every Tom, Dick and Harry was in on this deal, Greg. Very Happy



Last edited by Paul McGurkenfarklein on Sat 20 Sep 2014, 5:00 pm; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Question on TSBD (research)

Post by greg parker on Sat 20 Sep 2014, 4:57 pm

Paul McGurkenfarklein wrote:Its seems like every Tom, Dick and Harry was in on this deal, Greg. Very Happy

lol! How the hell did I miss that???

_________________
Mixing Pop and Politics he asks me what the use is
I offer him embarrassment and my usual excuses
While looking down the corridor
Out to where the van is waiting
I'm looking for the Great Leap Forward

            Billy Bragg
-----------------------------
 Australians don't mind criminals: It's successful bullshit artists we despise. 
             Lachie Hulme            
-----------------------------
The Cold War ran on bullshit.
              Me

greg parker
Admin

Posts : 3448
Join date : 2009-08-21
Age : 58
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Re: Question on TSBD (research)

Post by greg parker on Sat 20 Sep 2014, 5:36 pm

I should add a thanks to Stan. His research helped me nail this little section of the book down.

_________________
Mixing Pop and Politics he asks me what the use is
I offer him embarrassment and my usual excuses
While looking down the corridor
Out to where the van is waiting
I'm looking for the Great Leap Forward

            Billy Bragg
-----------------------------
 Australians don't mind criminals: It's successful bullshit artists we despise. 
             Lachie Hulme            
-----------------------------
The Cold War ran on bullshit.
              Me

greg parker
Admin

Posts : 3448
Join date : 2009-08-21
Age : 58
Location : Orange, NSW, Australia

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Re: Question on TSBD (research)

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