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Re: Nick McDonald

on Sat 08 Jul 2017, 5:23 pm
Video starting at 02:55
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0KFei3W7bGOZElxNDFOdnRJWE0/view

And in this one Paul Bentley gets to put his crutches on display for WFAA next to Nicky baby.....
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0KFei3W7bGOczREYm9aaTZVMjg/view

What a croc.......
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Re: Nick McDonald

on Mon 10 Jul 2017, 12:23 am
Going by his body language, Brewer looks very shifty in the first interview.

In the second interview, McDonald saying he didn't have his pistol drawn when approaching a copkiller suspect is hardly credible.
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Re: Nick McDonald

on Mon 10 Jul 2017, 1:43 am
barto wrote:Video starting at 02:55
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0KFei3W7bGOZElxNDFOdnRJWE0/view

And in this one Paul Bentley gets to put his crutches on display for WFAA next to Nicky baby.....
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0KFei3W7bGOczREYm9aaTZVMjg/view

What a croc.......

That interview is badly edited. It's missing the bit where Johnny says:

"When he went out the lobby and up to the theater I went out the sidewalk and watched him go in.  I left my shop in the capable hands of the two unidentified IBM gentlemen who I often spoke to during lunch but whose names I have forgotten.  These two unidentified IBM men were real good guys.  While I was involved in all the commotion in and outside the theater - they had gone done me a massive favour by closing up my store for me.  Which was nice.  These two fellows could have corroborated my story and firmed up the Warren Commission timeline - - but I didn't mention them until years later. So fuck all y'all."
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Re: Nick McDonald

on Tue 22 May 2018, 12:35 am
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Re: Nick McDonald

on Tue 22 May 2018, 9:22 pm
The house lights turned on And I continued with my deception..... Yeah Nicky you got that right! He misspoke but still....



http://emuseum.jfk.org/view/objects/asitem/classification@Oral%20Histories/98/title-asc?t:state:flow=b3e8c50e-5be4-4a22-9494-a391936df32a
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Re: Nick McDonald

on Fri 15 Jun 2018, 3:07 am
The Day Kennedy died by Jim Bishop

Officer Nick McDonald, a moon-faced man with dark skin and a high forehead was listening, almost absentmindedly, to the radio traffic at the School Book Depository building. He was working with his partner, T. R. Gregory, and they watched the Traffic division try to keep the curiosity seekers out of Dealey Plaza. The day now was summery and the patrolmen in the street were hotter than the weather, blowing whistles, diverting drivers, trying to prevent family cars from parking. McDonald had looked for an assignment at the School Book Depository, but the building was seething with cops.
The radio came on and Channel One announced, in the flat, toneless manner of police dispatchers, that word from Parkland was that President Kennedy had just expired. A moment later Nick McDonald heard the excited voice of a stranger announcing that a policeman had been shot. When he heard the area of the crime, he said to Gregory: “That’s Tippit. We’re not doing any good here. Let’s go up to Tenth Street.” On the way, they heard an additional report: that a suspect had been seen running into the basement of the public library at Marsalis and Jefferson. “Let’s go to the library,”
said McDonald. In the back of the car, the two men had a loaded shotgun. They brought it up front.

*****

Nick McDonald and the other policemen at the library ordered everybody in the library basement
to come out with their hands up. The door opened, and a few frightened people came out. They came
out slowly, including the young man in the white Eisenhower jacket—the suspect. It required only a
minute or two to ascertain that this was the wrong young man. He had been spotted running at top
speed into the basement of the library—true. But what had impelled him to do it was that he had just
heard that President Kennedy had been shot in downtown Dallas, and his friends were in the library.
He wanted to tell them. Also, he worked there.

*****

Johnny Brewer had finished checking all the exits except one. That was a door behind the stage.
He opened it slowly and found himself staring at a gun. A policeman said: “Who are you?” It was not
a time to hesitate. Brewer said that he was the one who had spotted the suspect. “I’m the one who told
the cashier to phone the police,” he said. Four cops, including Nick McDonald, turned Brewer around
and they went back into the theater. As they got onstage, in front of the screen, the house lights began
to go on. They weren’t bright. Policemen were in the balcony; others, with shotguns, sealed the aisles
at the rear of the theater.
The customers, scattered thinly over the orchestra, began to look around in surprise. Nick
McDonald heard young Brewer tell a policeman: “He’s not in the balcony. There he is,” and he
pointed to a man sitting alone between aisles near the rear of the theater. McDonald took officer C. T.
Walker offstage and up the left-hand aisle. The others—T. A. Hutson and Ray Hawkins—started up
the right side.
McDonald was pretty sure that he saw the man he wanted. The officer ordered two customers
down front to stand, and he frisked them as Walker stood behind him with his gun out. His eye was on
the target, and he noticed that the eye of the target was on him. The stranger did not move. The house
lights were up, but the projectionist forgot to shut the movie off, and the screen danced with pale
figures. There was the crack of rifle fire and the whistle of bullets.
Hawkins and Hutson, working the other aisle, stood behind two seated customers and said: “On
your feet.” The men were frisked for weapons and told to sit and remain seated. Nick McDonald
moved out of one row of seats to the right-hand aisle. His target was in the second seat off the edge
toward center. The two men locked eyes for a moment and McDonald walked toward the rear at a
leisurely gait. There was a man and a woman sitting behind the stranger, and McDonald kept looking
at them, so that he could keep his quarry within the perimeter of his vision.
The police officer almost passed the target. He kept walking back and, at the last second, swung
in quickly and shouted, “On your feet!” Lee Harvey Oswald stood, bringing both hands up and said:
“It’s all over.” Nick McDonald reached from the row in front, to slide his hands down the sports
shirt. Other policemen began to come in from both aisles, front and rear. It was at this moment that
Lee Harvey Oswald had a change of heart. He had known, from the moment the house lights went up,
that the Texas Theatre was full of policemen. There were sixteen—outnumbering the customers by
two. There was no possibility of escape. If he had no plan to flee Dallas—and barely the means—this
should have been an ideal way to achieve a public surrender. He did not know, of course, whether
they were taking him in for the Kennedy murder or the Tippit, and this may have made a difference to
him, although it is difficult to follow such a line of reasoning. Either one, on investigation, would lead
to the other crime.
Suddenly he brought both hands down a little. With the left, he punched Officer McDonald and
knocked his uniform cap off. The right went to his belt and he withdrew the Smith and Wesson
revolver. The policemen began to react by instinct. All of them recognized the danger, and each knew
that if this was the man who had killed Tippit, killing one or two more policemen would hardly alter
the issue for him.
Some dove at him from behind. McDonald swung hard and punched Oswald over the eye. The
other hand grabbed Oswald’s right hand and both came up with the gun. The nose of it gouged Nick
McDonald’s cheek and he and other officers heard a click. There was no explosion. Oswald and
McDonald fell down between the rows of seats. The cop yelled: “I’ve got him!” but he didn’t. Hutson
was directly behind Oswald and he caught the young man’s neck in the elbow of his right arm and
squeezed. C. T. Walker grabbed Oswald’s left arm and Hawkins, on the opposite side, fell on the pile
of writhing humans and kept pawing for the hand with the gun.
Detective Bob Carroll hurried into the aisle in time to see McDonald bring the revolver up by the
butt. He grabbed for the wrist as two other cops, down in the pileup, tried to force the prisoner’s
hands behind him. In a moment there was a snap and one of Oswald’s hands was handcuffed to a
policeman’s. The cop hollered that they had one wrong hand, and there was additional confusion as
they tried to free the policeman and secure both of Oswald’s hands behind his back. Carroll got the
gun and put it in his pocket.
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Re: Nick McDonald

on Fri 15 Jun 2018, 8:28 am
It has always seemed odd to me that LHO would react so violently in this instance when he was innocent of both murders (my contention) and surrounded by law enforcement officers...I am very open to the facts but its just all odd to me. Is it also the contention of the researchers here that the "theatrics" are simply that and that we don't really know fully what may have occurred in the theater?
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Re: Nick McDonald

on Fri 15 Jun 2018, 10:44 am
BC_11

It has always seemed odd to me that LHO would react so violently in this instance when he was innocent of both murders

I agree,

I would say, only my opinion - that Lee Oswald did not react violently-that he stood when told to do so- that he did nothing to provoke the police,- and that all he may have done is shout out that he was not resisting arrest to the officers who were beating him.

In the past 6-7 years while researching this case I've found the hardest thing to do regarding the assassination and Oswald is to clear the clutter from your brain regarding the official information we've all been exposed to over the years from the authorities.

A point in case is the Texas theatre, I've spent the past months going through all the statements and the known facts regarding the arrest. Nothing and I mean absolutely nothing lines up when I've applied the official narrative to the events which had taken place at that location. The timeline is a fantasy concocted by the authorities after the fact.

Brewer, Postal and Burroughs statements were a lie written up by the DPD after the fact. 
Same goes with McDonald, nothing he has said makes sense in light of what we do know.

As hard as it maybe for some to swallow, I believe - as many others here do too, that everything pertaining to Oswald's whereabouts on Friday from the moment he woke that morning is a fabrication, a lie perpetuated by the DPD to make the case against him for the murder of JFK and the killing of Tippit.

It's all make believe. Just my opinion.
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Re: Nick McDonald

on Sat 16 Jun 2018, 4:36 am
"It's all make believe. Just my opinion."

Hear, hear, Mick.

Methinks your opinion sums up the WC completely.

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