Search
Display results as :
Advanced Search
Latest topics
Craig's Mauser 7.65 stampSun 16 Dec 2018, 7:54 amMick Purdy
Fair Play For Brian DoyleThu 13 Dec 2018, 4:06 ambarto
More Tabloid TrashMon 10 Dec 2018, 8:06 amMick Purdy
Back Yard PhotographyMon 10 Dec 2018, 1:53 amJake Sykes
Amos Lee EuinsSat 08 Dec 2018, 9:48 ambarto
Judith McCullyWed 05 Dec 2018, 4:17 ambarto
Log in
Social bookmarking
Social bookmarking digg  Social bookmarking delicious  Social bookmarking reddit  Social bookmarking stumbleupon  Social bookmarking slashdot  Social bookmarking yahoo  Social bookmarking google  Social bookmarking blogmarks  Social bookmarking live      

Bookmark and share the address of REOPENKENNEDYCASE on your social bookmarking website

Bookmark and share the address of REOPENKENNEDYCASE on your social bookmarking website
RSS feeds

Yahoo! 
MSN 
AOL 
Netvibes 
Bloglines 
Like/Tweet/+1
Affiliates
free forum
 



Share
Go down
avatar
Posts : 877
Join date : 2013-07-26
Location : Melbourne Australia
View user profile

Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Sun 03 Jun 2018, 10:45 am
When the authorities arrived, Johnny and Butch stopped the projector and turned on the house lights. According to Brewer, "The policeman asked me if I would point him (the suspect) out. And I and two or three other officers walked out on the stage and I pulled back the theater curtain just enough to point him out. And there were officers coming in from the front of the show, I guess, coming toward that way, and officers going from the back."


http://allthingswildlyconsidered.blogspot.com/2013/11/johnny-brewer-humble-hero-of.html
avatar
Posts : 877
Join date : 2013-07-26
Location : Melbourne Australia
View user profile

Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Sun 03 Jun 2018, 10:48 am
In his testimony, McDonald reported: "I was going to search every person as I came to them before I got to him, so I wouldn't make a mistake or overlook anybody or anything else that might be connected. I was looking at him over my right shoulder, glancing at him, seeing what he was doing, making sure he was still in one place. I gave these guys (the other patrons) a pat search. I had them sit back down and I walked toward the suspect."





http://allthingswildlyconsidered.blogspot.com/2013/11/johnny-brewer-humble-hero-of.html
avatar
Posts : 877
Join date : 2013-07-26
Location : Melbourne Australia
View user profile

Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Sun 03 Jun 2018, 10:51 am
McDonald later said, "I stuck the gun into his stomach for just an instant. ... I thought about shooting him. The thought came through my mind, 'This guy's trying to kill me. I'll try to kill him.' Then I said to myself, 'Well, we don't need to shoot him because I've got him now. He's under control.'"

Brewer simply said, "He (the suspect) was fighting, still fighting, and I heard some of the police holler, I don't know who it was, 'Kill the President, will you?' And I saw fists flying and they were hitting him."





You can't make this shit up - Oops! someone already has.
avatar
Posts : 877
Join date : 2013-07-26
Location : Melbourne Australia
View user profile

Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Sun 03 Jun 2018, 10:52 am
Mrs. Postal also testified about the capture. She reported, "And they (the police) raced in, and the next thing I knew, they were carrying (unclear) -- well, that is when I first heard Officer Tippit had been shot because some officer came in the box office and used the phone, said, 'I think we have got our man on both accounts.' (Postal asked): 'What two accounts?' And he (the officer) said, "Well, Officer Tippit's.' This shocked me because Officer Tippit used to work part time for us years ago. I didn't know him personally."
avatar
Posts : 877
Join date : 2013-07-26
Location : Melbourne Australia
View user profile

Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Sun 03 Jun 2018, 11:08 am


So on the 6th Dec 1963 Brewer talks of a lobby, a man standing in the lobby of the shoe store. 

Brewer claims in this affidavit the suspect walked from the lobby up Jefferson after the police car had done a U turn. This story would later morph into a crazed man at his shoe shop looking scared and  nervous with his back to the street. Looking as though he was hiding. It would seem however that standing where Brewer claims he had from well inside the store, that would have meant that Brewer would have been looking out into the bright sunlight and the suspect would have been back lit making any form of identification extremely difficult I would imagine. He claims to have watched Oswald walking away from him up Jefferson and into the theatre from behind


Last edited by Mick Purdy on Sun 03 Jun 2018, 11:37 am; edited 1 time in total
avatar
Posts : 877
Join date : 2013-07-26
Location : Melbourne Australia
View user profile

Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Sun 03 Jun 2018, 11:20 am

The Lobby


Lobby:

a room providing a space out of which one or more other rooms or corridors lead, typically one near the entrance of a public building.
synonyms:entrance hall, hallway, entrance, hall, vestibule, foyer, 
avatar
Posts : 877
Join date : 2013-07-26
Location : Melbourne Australia
View user profile

Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Sun 03 Jun 2018, 11:41 am
Mr. BELIN - I want to take you back to November 22, 1963. This was the day that President Kennedy was assassinated. How did you find out about the assassination, Mr. Brewer


Mr. BREWER - We were listening to a transistor radio there in the store, just listening to a regular radio program, and they broke in with the bulletin that the President had been shot. And from then, that is all there was. We listened to all of the events.
avatar
Posts : 877
Join date : 2013-07-26
Location : Melbourne Australia
View user profile

Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Sun 03 Jun 2018, 11:43 am
Would Brewer really have been able to positively ID the man he saw in the shoe store lobby.


avatar
Posts : 877
Join date : 2013-07-26
Location : Melbourne Australia
View user profile

Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Sun 03 Jun 2018, 12:59 pm


0:28 - 0:56

Brewer seems unsure about whether the description of the suspect is for the President's assassination or the Tippit murder. He has no clue. Notice how he promptly adds the Tippit murder into the anser with relation to the suspect description.
avatar
Posts : 877
Join date : 2013-07-26
Location : Melbourne Australia
View user profile

Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Sun 03 Jun 2018, 1:28 pm
Suspect description sent out after the assassination
12:45DispatcherAttention Elm and Houston is reported to be an unknown white male, all squads. Attention all squads. The suspect in the shooting at approximately thirty, slender build, height five feet ten inches, weight one hundred sixty-five pounds, reported to be armed with what is thought to be a 30 caliber rifle. Attention all squads. The suspect from Elm and Houston is reported to be an unknown white male about thirty, slender build, five feet ten inches tall, one hundred sixty-five pounds, armed with what is thought to be a 30-30 rifle. No further description at this time, or information. 12:45.
avatar
Posts : 877
Join date : 2013-07-26
Location : Melbourne Australia
View user profile

Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Sun 03 Jun 2018, 1:32 pm
1:22DispatcherRemain in the downtown vicinity, 26. Clear. 1:22.  
 26 (Ptm. G.W. Hammond)10-4.  
 75 (Ptm. E.G. Sabastian)75 Clear.  
 85 (Ptm. R.W. Walker)85.  
 Dispatcher85.  
 85We have a description on this suspect over here on Jefferson. Last seen about 300 block of East Jefferson. He's a white male, about thirty, five eight, (siren) black hair, slender, wearing white jacket, a white shirt and dark slacks. (Sirens)  
 DispatcherArmed with what?  
 85Unknown.




Description over DPD dispatch regarding Tippit's killer.

Johnny Brewer has it wrong on both counts.
avatar
Posts : 877
Join date : 2013-07-26
Location : Melbourne Australia
View user profile

Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Sun 03 Jun 2018, 1:51 pm


1:10:36

Description of Kennedy's assassin
avatar
Posts : 877
Join date : 2013-07-26
Location : Melbourne Australia
View user profile

Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Fri 08 Jun 2018, 11:58 am
From Greg R Parker:

http://reopenkennedycase.forumotion.net/t1629-get-me-to-helsinki-in-a-hurry


The police swooped straight up onto the balcony after being told the Tippit suspect was in the that area of the building. The balcony itself has a series of alcoves.







But more than that, according to a 1967 CBC interview with Gerald Hill, Oswald was subjected to a “fast frisk” as soon as he was handcuffed in the theater. When asked to explain what that meant, Hill replied “an officer checks under your armpits, your crotch, your pockets, your shirt, your waistband of your trousers, and anywhere a weapon could be concealed, even as small as a razor blade, or anything of this type you could be conceivably get to and either hurt the officer or hurt yourself”. Hill has accurately described the search and its singular aim: finding weapons.  However, in this case, “the plain feel” doctrine would also apply. That is if, during the pat-down, the officer feels an object whose “contour or mass” makes its identity immediately apparent, and the officer has probable cause to believe that the object is evidence of a crime, or is itself contraband, it may be seized.” At the very least then, the 5 shells said to have been found by Detective Elmer Boyd just prior to the first line up (more than 2 hours after Oswald’s capture), should have been enveloped at the time of the “quick frisk” on the basis that the “feel” of the pocket would easily tell you what they were. Additionally, since you were investigating a homicide, they could reasonably be suspected as being evidence, therefore validating their seizure. Even worse, body searches are often used to cover either illegal searches for other contraband, or more ominously here, to plant incriminating evidence.

So the official sequence was this:

1: 50 pm arrested and frisked. Nothing taken.
2:20 pm first interrogation. Nothing taken
4:05 pm taken away for first line up. Searched by Boyd and Sims. Shells taken from trousers, bus transfer ticket, cash, key, card with phone number, American Bakeries pay slip and part of a Cox’s box top all taken from shirt pocket, ring and bracelet taken from hand and wrist.


Based on the above, the best we can safely say is that no shells were in Oswald’s pockets at the time of his arrest, otherwise they would have been taken as evidence.

 
A new find however, adds another item to the list of items pulled from Oswald’s pockets – an item that is, within itself proof that it was the sole item which could have been found by Sims and Boyd. It was a police property receipt.







Boyd and Sims, who did lie about finding the shells, let the cat out in their testimony with no memory of most of the other items:

Mr. STERN. The memorandum mentions the cartridges--bus transfer, except that he had a ring on his finger which he took off and he gave it to Mr. Sims. Do you remember any other items that he had that you got from him during this search? 
Mr. BOYD. No, sir; I know that Mr. Sims did get the bus transfer and took his ring--he took his ring off and give it to Mr. Sims, and I got those five shells, and that's all that I recall being taken from him. 
 
Sims testimony is more detailed, but again, the only items he recalls are the bus transfer, shells and bracelet and ring.


In short, Oswald, except for a missed bus transfer, already had his pocket litter confiscated. The only items taken by Boyd and Sims, other than the transfer, were his jewelry, belt and of course, the property receipt.  

avatar
Posts : 877
Join date : 2013-07-26
Location : Melbourne Australia
View user profile

Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Fri 08 Jun 2018, 2:10 pm




Greg Wrote:


The Cox box top was yet another page ripped from the Rosenberg playbook. There is eyewitness evidence suggesting Oswald was to be killed in that theater. Reporter Jim Ewell watched from the balcony as a shotgun was poked through the tangle of bodies at Oswald. It would seem too many witnesses and his own yelling that he was not resisting, combined to save his life, at least in the short term.

Whoever was setting Oswald up was intimately aware of the minutia in the Rosenberg case and was using that knowledge to try and set Oswald up as a communist member of a spy ring. We will look at members of the Rosenberg ring in more detail later, as well as identify the most likely source of the Rosenberg case details.
avatar
Posts : 877
Join date : 2013-07-26
Location : Melbourne Australia
View user profile

Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Fri 08 Jun 2018, 2:12 pm




Greg Wrote:


Oswald’s first press interview in Moscow was with Aline Mosby and as a result, a story was published in the US under her name titled Fort Worth Defector Confirms Red BeliefsIt was a straightforward, perhaps even slightly sympathetic story that painted Oswald as thoughtful and earnest.

Post-assassination however, Mosby wrote a second story. This time the story was overtly sympathetic – to the government portrayal of Oswald as having a mother-complex, having a shallow understanding of Marxism, and of being arrogant, among other epithets not brought out in the original – yet allegedly based on the same interview notes.

The second story also added this purported quote from Oswald, “I became interested in Marxism about the age of 15 from an ideological viewpoint. An old lady handed me a pamphlet about saving the Rosenbergs”. In the original 1959 story, all that was stated was that he had been “a devoted believer in communism and had read books on the subject since he was 15.” The alleged pamphlet incident was in New York and he had left New York only a couple of months after his 14th birthday. What the reading and age does fit with is his time in the Civil Air Patrol (CAP) and a possible recruitment into its anti-subversive program.

The Rosenberg leaflet incident written about by Mosby post-assassination never happened. It was a lie based on an incident described in Julius Rosenberg's letters from prison.

Here is what Rosenberg himself wrote about his own political awakening: “Although only fifteen years old, I was fully aware of conditions around me and felt a deep social responsibility to do something about them… Now one day on my way home from school I stopped to listen to a speaker at a corner meeting on Delancey St in the lower east side. His topic was the campaign to win freedom for Tom Mooney labor leader who was imprisoned on a frameup. The same night I read a pamphlet I had bought from the speaker that presented all the facts of this case and listed how the reader could help free this innocent victim.”

But the borrowing from the Rosenberg files do not stop there. 

















Greg Wrote:




We now come to the story of a torn box-top as revealed in the Rosenberg trial. David Greenglass was the brother-in-law of Julius Rosenberg and had been recruited into the spy while serving in the army and working on the Manhattan Project at Los Alamos.  Greenglass had buckled under pressure when his wife Ruth was implicated. To save her, he turned state witness against Julius and his own sister, Ethel.
avatar
Posts : 877
Join date : 2013-07-26
Location : Melbourne Australia
View user profile

Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Fri 08 Jun 2018, 2:15 pm
McDonald later said, "I stuck the gun into his stomach for just an instant. ... I thought about shooting him. The thought came through my mind, 'This guy's trying to kill me. I'll try to kill him.' Then I said to myself, 'Well, we don't need to shoot him because I've got him now. He's under control.'"
avatar
Posts : 877
Join date : 2013-07-26
Location : Melbourne Australia
View user profile

Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Fri 08 Jun 2018, 2:17 pm
"He's under control" 


or 

Not resisting arrest.
avatar
Posts : 877
Join date : 2013-07-26
Location : Melbourne Australia
View user profile

Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Sun 10 Jun 2018, 10:39 am


A bus trip from the TSBD (6th Floor Museum) to the Texas theatre present day.
Google maps.
avatar
Posts : 877
Join date : 2013-07-26
Location : Melbourne Australia
View user profile

Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Sun 10 Jun 2018, 10:46 am


The official version of Oswald's route taken to get to the Texas theatre.
Credit: Robert Riversong Wordpress.com "Oswald's crazy journey"
avatar
Posts : 1281
Join date : 2015-07-21
View user profilehttp://www.prayer-man.com/

Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Fri 15 Jun 2018, 3:13 am
From The Day Kennedy Died by Jim Bishop.

She took ninety cents apiece from each of them. Mrs. Postal was not discouraged. There would be
plenty of customers before the day was over. The Texas Theatre had a one-price policy: ninety cents
no matter what time the customer arrived. The war pictures always attracted the men. The manager,
Mr. John A. Callahan, was inside. He was excited about the shooting of the President. He was talking
to Butch Burroughs, who handled the hot buttered popcorn and the candy inside the lobby. It was a
small movie house, part of a chain, but Callahan and Mrs. Postal and Burroughs kept it clean.
On the same side of the street, Johnny Calvin Brewer managed Hardy’s Shoe Shop. Mr. Brewer
was only twenty-three years old, but he was ambitious and industrious. He had been entrusted with
his own shop for fourteen months, and the big bosses did not regret it. At the moment, there wasn’t a
customer in the store, and Johnny Brewer, neatly dressed in a nice suit and tie, listened to a radio
telling the awful events going on in downtown Dallas. A moment ago another flash had come on:
some policeman—no name was given—had been shot at Tenth and Patton, right here in Oak Cliff.
The youthful manager wondered what the heck the world was coming to. He was listening and
facing the open front door when he heard the shrill scream of a siren. It was approaching the store
seemingly at top speed. Mr. Brewer was waiting to see which way it was going when a young man in
a flappy shirt turned in toward the store. The windows were recessed from the sidewalk in a “V.”
The stranger appeared to be studying the shoes in one of the windows. The police car whizzed by and
the stranger walked out on the sidewalk and continued on his way.
The manager thought that the man seemed suspicious. He couldn’t say why, and perhaps if a
customer had been in the store he might have paid no attention to the matter. But the store was empty,
and the radio was full of flashes of terrible deeds, one of them only eight blocks away. Johnny
Brewer stepped out on the sidewalk and shaded his eyes.
He looked toward the Texas Theatre and saw Julia Postal—now free of customers—out at the
curb. Mr. Callahan was hopping into his car and she was talking to him. The stranger with the dirtylooking
sports shirt and the slacks turned into the Texas Theatre, without buying a ticket, and
disappeared. Callahan was telling Julia Postal that he was going to follow that police car to find out
what the excitement was.
Johnny Brewer approached the cashier as she returned to her post, and he asked her if she had
sold a ticket to a man “wearing a brown shirt.” She said she couldn’t remember one. Mr. Brewer,
who is not easily dissuaded, said that a man had ducked into the movie while she had been out talking
at the curb. The shoe store manager insisted that this was a most suspicious person because, as the
police car approached his shop with the siren at its loudest, the man had pretended to look at shoes
and then had walked on to the Texas Theatre and was now inside without purchasing a ticket.
She hadn’t sold a ticket in the past ten minutes. The movie was just starting, so Brewer walked
inside and asked Butch Burroughs if he had seen a man in a brown shirt passing through. No, the
candy butcher said, he had been busy and he wanted to know why. “I think the guy looks suspicious,
that’s why.”
It seemed like a lot of trouble for one ninety-cent gate crasher, but Brewer was going to follow
his lead all the way. He reminded himself that the cashier’s booth is flush with all the storefronts on
the street and, if the man had stopped to buy a ticket, he would have been in plain view from the shoe
store. Besides, Julia Postal wasn’t in the booth. And another “besides”—why didn’t the man look up
to watch that shrieking police car go by? Who looks at shoes at a time like that? Brewer thought the
stranger looked “messed up and scared.”
The cashier was excitable, but she thought that Butch Burroughs was more excitable, and she
warned Johnny Brewer not to look for the stranger but to check the exits to make certain that he was
still in the theater. The exits were properly locked from the inside. Julia Postal could not contain
herself any longer, so she dialed the operator and asked for the police.
They were busy with two homicides. Mrs. Postal told the officer that she thought “we have your
man.” He said, “Why do you think it’s our man?” and the woman gave him a description of a floppy
sports shirt and a young man of medium build. “All I know,” she said, “is this man is running from
them for some reason.” The policeman asked why, and she said, “Every time the sirens go by he
ducks.” The policeman asked casually what kind of a complexion the man had, and Julia Postal said
she had not really seen him but it was “ruddy.” She heard “Thank you” and a dial tone.
Mrs. Postal then phoned up to the projectionist. He didn’t understand the request, but the cashier
asked him to look through his little peephole to see “if he could see anything.” She said she had called
the police. “Do you want me to stop the picture?” he said. He looked out at the screen. Audie Murphy,
an American war hero, was explaining why “war is hell” as a prologue. “No,” she said. “Let’s wait
until they get here.” She didn’t have long to wait. A moment after she hung up, police cars began to
pile up in front of the theater in awkward parking postures, and men were running toward the lobby
with guns drawn. Julia Postal pointed inside and said: “He’s upstairs,” although she was surmising.
Johnny Brewer had finished checking all the exits except one. That was a door behind the stage.
He opened it slowly and found himself staring at a gun. A policeman said: “Who are you?” It was not
a time to hesitate. Brewer said that he was the one who had spotted the suspect. “I’m the one who told
the cashier to phone the police,” he said. Four cops, including Nick McDonald, turned Brewer around
and they went back into the theater. As they got onstage, in front of the screen, the house lights began
to go on. They weren’t bright. Policemen were in the balcony; others, with shotguns, sealed the aisles
at the rear of the theater.
The customers, scattered thinly over the orchestra, began to look around in surprise. Nick
McDonald heard young Brewer tell a policeman: “He’s not in the balcony. There he is,” and he
pointed to a man sitting alone between aisles near the rear of the theater. McDonald took officer C. T.
Walker offstage and up the left-hand aisle. The others—T. A. Hutson and Ray Hawkins—started up
the right side.
McDonald was pretty sure that he saw the man he wanted. The officer ordered two customers
down front to stand, and he frisked them as Walker stood behind him with his gun out. His eye was on
the target, and he noticed that the eye of the target was on him. The stranger did not move. The house
lights were up, but the projectionist forgot to shut the movie off, and the screen danced with pale
figures. There was the crack of rifle fire and the whistle of bullets.
Hawkins and Hutson, working the other aisle, stood behind two seated customers and said: “On
your feet.” The men were frisked for weapons and told to sit and remain seated. Nick McDonald
moved out of one row of seats to the right-hand aisle. His target was in the second seat off the edge
toward center. The two men locked eyes for a moment and McDonald walked toward the rear at a
leisurely gait. There was a man and a woman sitting behind the stranger, and McDonald kept looking
at them, so that he could keep his quarry within the perimeter of his vision.
The police officer almost passed the target. He kept walking back and, at the last second, swung
in quickly and shouted, “On your feet!” Lee Harvey Oswald stood, bringing both hands up and said:
“It’s all over.” Nick McDonald reached from the row in front, to slide his hands down the sports
shirt. Other policemen began to come in from both aisles, front and rear. It was at this moment that
Lee Harvey Oswald had a change of heart. He had known, from the moment the house lights went up,
that the Texas Theatre was full of policemen. There were sixteen—outnumbering the customers by
two. There was no possibility of escape. If he had no plan to flee Dallas—and barely the means—this
should have been an ideal way to achieve a public surrender. He did not know, of course, whether
they were taking him in for the Kennedy murder or the Tippit, and this may have made a difference to
him, although it is difficult to follow such a line of reasoning. Either one, on investigation, would lead
to the other crime.
Suddenly he brought both hands down a little. With the left, he punched Officer McDonald and
knocked his uniform cap off. The right went to his belt and he withdrew the Smith and Wesson
revolver. The policemen began to react by instinct. All of them recognized the danger, and each knew
that if this was the man who had killed Tippit, killing one or two more policemen would hardly alter
the issue for him.
Some dove at him from behind. McDonald swung hard and punched Oswald over the eye. The
other hand grabbed Oswald’s right hand and both came up with the gun. The nose of it gouged Nick
McDonald’s cheek and he and other officers heard a click. There was no explosion. Oswald and
McDonald fell down between the rows of seats. The cop yelled: “I’ve got him!” but he didn’t. Hutson
was directly behind Oswald and he caught the young man’s neck in the elbow of his right arm and
squeezed. C. T. Walker grabbed Oswald’s left arm and Hawkins, on the opposite side, fell on the pile
of writhing humans and kept pawing for the hand with the gun.
Detective Bob Carroll hurried into the aisle in time to see McDonald bring the revolver up by the
butt. He grabbed for the wrist as two other cops, down in the pileup, tried to force the prisoner’s
hands behind him. In a moment there was a snap and one of Oswald’s hands was handcuffed to a
policeman’s. The cop hollered that they had one wrong hand, and there was additional confusion as
they tried to free the policeman and secure both of Oswald’s hands behind his back. Carroll got the
gun and put it in his pocket.
The prisoner was lifted up like a submerged object. His pouting mouth was framed in a painful
“O” and he called the policemen “Sons of bitches!” and “Bastards!” A policeman brought his fist up
hard and caught the defenseless prisoner in the head. McDonald, chubby and perspiring, was still
down between the seats, looking for his cap and flashlight, both of which had rolled under the seats.
“Don’t hit me anymore!” Oswald shouted as he was dragged out into the aisle. The customers
down front turned to watch, but they remembered that they had been told to remain seated, so no one
moved. The cops were not sympathetic. All of them had heard, on Channel One, that Officer 78 had
been DOA at the hospital and had heard the dispatcher ask a sergeant to please stop at Tippit’s house
at once to break the news to Mrs. Tippit before she could hear it on radio.
“This is police brutality!” Oswald shouted as he was half dragged, half carried through the lobby.
Butch Burroughs, nervous in normal situations, watched the big group go by and saw Oswald’s hands
being brought up high and tight against his spine. Oswald shouted “Ow!” and called upon the theater
patrons to witness this violation of his rights. “Just get him out,” said Sergeant Owens. As they passed
the lobby clock, the hands pointed to 1:50.
Trade people and passing motorists had stopped to see the excitement and, as Oswald was
shoved toward a police car at the curb, fifty or sixty men began to shout: “Kill him!” “String him up!”
without bothering to find out the charge or the guilt or innocence of the prisoner. Sergeant Jerry Hill
pointed to a sedan and said: “Put him in the back seat.” Oswald, sensing alienation from the crowd,
shouted: “I want a lawyer. I know my rights!” An excited middle-aged man in the crowd shouted:
“That’s the one. We ought to kill him.” The prisoner was hustled across the sidewalk, protesting:
“This is typical police brutality. Why are you doing this to me?” It amounted to more words than most
acquaintances had heard from Lee Harvey Oswald at one time.
The car pulled away from the curb and Sergeant Hill got on Channel One and said that the suspect
in the Tippit homicide had been arrested, after a struggle, in the Texas Theatre on West Jefferson.
They were now bringing the prisoner to headquarters. Carroll, driving, got the revolver from his
pocket and handed it to the sergeant. The car turned into Zangs Boulevard and moved at good speed
across the Houston Street viaduct into downtown Dallas. As the sedan turned onto Elm Street, the
School Book Depository flashed by on the left side. No one in the car gave it more than a glance.
“Why don’t you see if he has any identification?” the sergeant asked Officer Paul Bentley. In the
back, the policeman began to go through the pockets. “Yes,” he said. “He has a billfold.” Oswald,
trying to bring his wrists down behind him into a more comfortable position, said: “I don’t know why
you are doing this to me. The only thing I have done is carry a pistol in a movie.” Another policeman
said: “You have done a lot more. You have killed a policeman.” The net effect of this exchange was
that Lee Oswald now knew which crime had led to his entrapment. “Well,” Oswald said quietly, “you
can fry for that.”
The policemen thought that their man was in a talking mood, and they decided to take advantage of
it. They didn’t know that he had already taken advantage of them. “What’s your name?” one asked.
“That,” said Oswald, “is for you to find out.” Another cop said: “You’ll fry.” The prisoner shrugged.
“They say it only takes a second.” “Here’s his name: it’s Lee Oswald.” The sergeant said: “You Lee
Oswald?” The prisoner had lost interest. “No,” the policeman said, “I have another card here. Are
you Alex Hidell? Hidd-ell, or High-dell?” There was no response. The sergeant asked Carroll: “Is
this gun yours?” “No,” the driver said, jerking his head toward the rear of the car. “It’s his.”
Walker and Bentley, in the rear seat, tilted Oswald this way and that to get to his pockets. In one
they found a handful of .38 cartridges. Sergeant Hill opened the chamber of the gun in his hand and
found that one bullet had a dent in the back. The concern of the five policemen was to drive the sedan
into the basement at police headquarters, get this man Hidell or Oswald up to Captain Fritz’s
Homicide division on the third floor, deliver him intact, and book him on suspicion of homicide—to
wit, the slaying of Police Officer J. D. Tippit.
Back on Jefferson, young Johnny Brewer suddenly remembered his shoe store, open and
unprotected. As he skipped along the sidewalk, he wondered how long he had been away. The total
time was eight minutes.
avatar
Posts : 877
Join date : 2013-07-26
Location : Melbourne Australia
View user profile

Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Fri 15 Jun 2018, 10:21 am
This book released I believe in 1968 represents the fairy tale as reported by the Warren Commission, but it's even worse than that as it's been hawked about under the pretence of being an accurate detailed recount of the events of Friday 22nd November 1963. Nothing could be further from the truth in my opinion.

Thanks for posting this Bart, it shows the complete and utter bias by the author, with no regard to any of the known facts.

"Johnny Brewer remembered his shoe store-skipped back along the sidewalk", please spare us all
avatar
Posts : 877
Join date : 2013-07-26
Location : Melbourne Australia
View user profile

Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Fri 15 Jun 2018, 11:51 am


And from Ed,
Dallas Transit Transfer:






11/22/63  After that, Curry said, it is known that Oswald descended and left the building on foot.

… Somehow - Curry doesn't know - Oswald reached the Oak Cliff section, across the Trinity River from downtown Dallas.  AP, 1:50 p.m. CST Peggy Simpson


11/23/63  Dallas - The police chief said that as far as the police know, Oswald does not own an automobile.

The police chief said it was still uncertain how Oswald reached the Oak Cliff section of Dallas.

"He left on foot from the building.  Someone said they saw a man pick him up [in a car] but Oswald had a bus transfer slip in his pocket when arrested," Curry said.  AP, 11:17 am CST, Peggy Simpson



11/23/63   Homicide Captain Will Fritz said Oswald had told police he caught a bus when he left the Depository Building, decided the bus was too slow and switched to a taxicab.  He went to his rooming house in Oak Cliff, changed clothing and decided to go to a movie.  3:07 p.m. CST – [Sub for "Somehow ... downtown Dallas"] AP, 3:07 p.m. CST


Curry still had a car story afloat on Saturday and not even the bus transfer appearance itself on Friday would deter him. 

Thanks to Bart for showing me this schism in a new light!!!!

First interrogation 2:20pm - 4:05pm  Friday

At 3:07 pm Saturday AP reporters report Fritz's bus and taxi tale. 

When was that envelope marked by Boyd and Sims for the bus transfer find??


4:05pm Friday 


More than possible Lee Oswald caught the above Beckley bus to the Texas theatre
avatar
Posts : 1281
Join date : 2015-07-21
View user profilehttp://www.prayer-man.com/

Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Sat 16 Jun 2018, 10:50 am



avatar
Posts : 877
Join date : 2013-07-26
Location : Melbourne Australia
View user profile

Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Sat 16 Jun 2018, 11:18 am
Great pics Barto,


Last edited by Mick Purdy on Sat 16 Jun 2018, 11:44 am; edited 1 time in total
avatar
Posts : 877
Join date : 2013-07-26
Location : Melbourne Australia
View user profile

Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Sat 16 Jun 2018, 11:29 am
The Donald House arrest and the Texas theater arrest of Oswald.




Last edited by Mick Purdy on Sat 16 Jun 2018, 11:38 am; edited 1 time in total
Sponsored content

Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

Back to top
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum