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Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Tue 22 May 2018, 2:27 pm
Corroboration? Maybe

I was thinking along the same lines Ed.
It fits.

And Macca just happens to take front row in the theatre too. 

This scenario, at least to me makes much more sense of the avalanche of cops turning up at the theatre -more  than anything Brewer or Postal could've said.
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Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Tue 22 May 2018, 3:30 pm
You know what I' suggesting Y'all.

Nick is our man. he was the reason for the turn out......he phoned it in. No Brewer, no Postal.

Nick had to make it look good too. Didn't go straight to Oswald in the theatre, no sir. That'd give him away-can't go straight to oswald no way.
Pistol drawn he pats down a few others first so nobody suspects his little plan - Oswald was gonna die...
Oswald foiled that idea by yelling out I'm not resisting, damn! Nick tries to shoot the cop killer but Oswald grabs the gun damn again .

Maybe maybe not!
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Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Tue 22 May 2018, 8:19 pm
So who did Brewer see anyway? Did he perhaps see no one after all? Or could it have been an Oswald lookalike like Larry Crafard?
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Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Tue 22 May 2018, 9:33 pm
Mick Purdy wrote:So who did make that call-in to the DPD. You know-the one which triggered a tsunami of cops and firepower onto the Texas Theatre


This is from the Nick McDonald thread where I posted this piece in March 2017.
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Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Tue 22 May 2018, 9:45 pm
Stuff is getting mixed up or duplicated. So here is Nick McDonald's thread
http://reopenkennedycase.forumotion.net/t1341-nick-mcdonald
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Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Wed 23 May 2018, 3:41 am
Mick Purdy wrote:You know what I' suggesting Y'all.

Nick is our man. he was the reason for the turn out......he phoned it in. No Brewer, no Postal.

Nick had to make it look good too. Didn't go straight to Oswald in the theatre, no sir. That'd give him away-can't go straight to oswald no way.
Pistol drawn he pats down a few others first so nobody suspects his little plan - Oswald was gonna die...
Oswald foiled that idea by yelling out I'm not resisting, damn! Nick tries to shoot the cop killer but Oswald grabs the gun damn again .

Maybe maybe not!
Could be Mick.
Could be Callahan. His story is strange. No questions for this guy. Postal says he left to follow the police cars......which will shortly turn up where he's just left. Seems he lost interest pretty quickly.

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Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Wed 23 May 2018, 8:47 am
barto wrote:
Mick Purdy wrote:So who did make that call-in to the DPD. You know-the one which triggered a tsunami of cops and firepower onto the Texas Theatre


This is from the Nick McDonald thread where I posted this piece in March 2017.
Thanks Barto couldn't remember where it was from. Cheers!
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Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Wed 23 May 2018, 8:50 am
steely dan wrote:
Mick Purdy wrote:You know what I' suggesting Y'all.

Nick is our man. he was the reason for the turn out......he phoned it in. No Brewer, no Postal.

Nick had to make it look good too. Didn't go straight to Oswald in the theatre, no sir. That'd give him away-can't go straight to oswald no way.
Pistol drawn he pats down a few others first so nobody suspects his little plan - Oswald was gonna die...
Oswald foiled that idea by yelling out I'm not resisting, damn! Nick tries to shoot the cop killer but Oswald grabs the gun damn again .

Maybe maybe not!
Could be Mick.
Could be Callahan. His story is strange. No questions for this guy. Postal says he left to follow the police cars......which will shortly turn up where he's just left. Seems he lost interest pretty quickly.
Yep,

That's a real possibility.........

We ROKC here at ROKC.

Callahan tips Nick, Nick phones in and Lee is done.
Maybe, maybe not. Good story though.
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Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Wed 23 May 2018, 9:07 am
AFFIDAVIT IN ANY FACT



THE STATE OF TEXAS
COUNTY OF DALLAS



BEFORE ME,_ WflS E f_ s/ffORR

a Notary Public in and for said County, State of Texas, on this day personally appeared.

w/f/39, 2728 Seevers, FR 6-5750.



Julia Postal,



Who, after being by me duly sworn, on oath deposes and says: I Work at the Texas Theatre at 231

West Jefferson, WH 6-2161. I have worked there since November 21i, 1952. Dn
Friday, November 22, 1963, at approximately Ii30 Bora little later I was
working in toe ticket office at toe theater. I was listening to my transistor
radio, and KLIF had just announced that President Kennedy was dead. I had
just seen a police car go west on Jefferson. As the police went by, a man
ducked inside toe theater.
My boss, Mr. John A. Callahan went outside, got in
his car and left to see where the police were going
. I stepped from toe box
office to the front and looked west. When I turned around, Johnny Brewer,
Manager of Hardy's Shoes Store, was standing there. As I started back in the
box office, Johnny asked me if I sold that man a ticket. I asked him what man.
He said that man that just ducked in here. I told Mm no, I didn't, but I had
noticed him as he ducked in here.

Maybe John left, or not.
Too many John's
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Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Wed 23 May 2018, 10:29 am
I have to admit to being conflicted as to whether Brewer followed somebody or fabricated his story, but the clip from the 6FM really raises suspicions. 

For example, he says Oswald walked in the shoe store and Brewer "recognized" him. Say what? Now, this could be his mind playing tricks in the sense that later he felt he recognized the man as Oswald, having seen the papers, and he then transposed that post-event memory retroactively into his real time retelling of the story. I can see that. 

On another hand, knowing it sounded weak, he may have felt the need to bolster his story for rationalizing following the guy, without really thinking it through as he told it.

On yet another hand, he could have slipped up and revealed he'd been prepped with a photo of a guy (a double) that he was to follow in and have the cops called on. I don't like this much because of the following.

If Brewer really was a player in a plot to have Oswald killed in the theater, then the original plan could have been to fabricate the story of following Oswald into the theater. It's really a better way to do it if one thinks about it since the entire variable of Postal, Burroughs, or any other random witness actually observing or encountering a double whose timing might be off or who is recognized as not actually being Oswald, is entirely eliminated. It's like Brewer says it is, and nobody else sees anything but Brewer. It doesn't mean a double or some other involved person wasn't in the premises, it simply means that Brewer can operate/fabricate independently of where such a person may actually be.

To reiterate, if Tippet had not been planned to be shot and we accept that Oswald couldn't have done it (yes, we've discussed the possibility that Tippet was unrelated to the assassination) then the original plan, if Brewer was truly involved, could have been for Callaway to leave the premises, for Brewer to playact to Postal that someone sneaked in, then to playact to Burroughs that someone sneaked in, look around inside and to cajole someone else or to place a call himself to police. In that way, it would explain the presence of the (one) predesignated responding cop (instead of an army of them because of Tippet) who would kill Oswald then and there. In any event (an essentially key point if Tippet wasn't planned), it is as Brewer calls it and no one else sees anything except to confirm that Brewer was there (or to be coerced later on into confirming what Brewer says, as it appears Postal was).

Also, it would be a well rehearsed story that Brewer would be able to tell and stick to forever. By the same token, it's a story that could never be told or witnessed at all, if that's what actual circumstances turned out to dictate.

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Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Wed 23 May 2018, 11:42 am
Taking the cue from Bart, I'm including Hasan's Thread on a similar subject

http://reopenkennedycase.forumotion.net/t371-suspect-behind-the-texas-theatre
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Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Wed 23 May 2018, 12:08 pm
steely dan wrote:
Mick Purdy wrote:You know what I' suggesting Y'all.

Nick is our man. he was the reason for the turn out......he phoned it in. No Brewer, no Postal.

Nick had to make it look good too. Didn't go straight to Oswald in the theatre, no sir. That'd give him away-can't go straight to oswald no way.
Pistol drawn he pats down a few others first so nobody suspects his little plan - Oswald was gonna die...
Oswald foiled that idea by yelling out I'm not resisting, damn! Nick tries to shoot the cop killer but Oswald grabs the gun damn again .

Maybe maybe not!
Could be Mick.
Could be Callahan. His story is strange. No questions for this guy. Postal says he left to follow the police cars......which will shortly turn up where he's just left. Seems he lost interest pretty quickly.
Callahan is def a candidate IMO. No way No how they stormed that theatre from the supposed Postal call in. Not for me anyways
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Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Wed 23 May 2018, 2:48 pm
Mr. BREWER - We were listening to a transistor radio there in the store, just listening to a regular radio program, and they broke in with the bulletin that the President had been shot. And from then, that is all there was. We listened to all of the events. 
Mr. BELIN - Did you hear over the radio that the President had died? 
Mr. BREWER - I heard a rumor. They said that----one of the Secret Service men said that the President had died, and said that was just a rumor. 
Mr. BELIN - Do you remember hearing anything else over the radio concerning anything that happened that afternoon? 
Mr. BREWER - Well, they kept reconstructing what had happened and what they had heard, and they talked about it in general. There wasn't too much to talk about. They didn't have all the facts, and just repeated them mostly. And they said a patrolman had been shot in Oak Cliff. 
Mr. BELIN - Is Oak Cliff the area in which your shoe store was located? 
Mr. BREWER - Yes, sir. 
Mr. BELIN - All right, would you describe what happened after you heard on the radio that an officer had been shot? 
Mr. BREWER - Well, there was heard a siren coming down East Jefferson headed toward West Jefferson. 
Mr. BELIN - What is the dividing street between East and West Jefferson? 
Mr. BREWER - Beckley. 
Mr. BELIN - How far is Beckley from your store? 
Mr. BREWER - Two blocks. 
Mr. BELIN - Two blocks to the east or to the west? 
Mr. BREWER - There is Zangs to the east. The first street is Zangs and the next street is Beckley. 
Mr. BELIN - The first street east is Zangs Boulevard and the next street is Beckley? 
Mr. BREWER - Yes, right. 
Mr. BELIN - Is your store located to the north or south side of Jefferson? 
Mr. BREWER - On the north. 
Mr. BELIN - All right. 
Mr. BREWER - I looked up and out towards the street and the police cars---- 
Mr. BELIN - When you looked up, did you step out of the store at all? 
Mr. BREWER - No; I was Still in the store behind the counter, and I looked up and saw the man enter the lobby. 
Mr. BELIN - When you say the lobby of your store, first let me ask you to describe how is----how wide is your store, approximately? 
Mr. BREWER - About 20 feet. 
Mr. BELIN - All right, is the entrance to your store right on the sidewalk? 
Mr. BREWER - The entrance to the store is about 15 feet from the sidewalk, front doors. 
Mr. BELIN - The front doors? 
Mr. BREWER - Yes; they are recessed, and then there is windows, show windows on each side. 
Mr. BELIN - This would be, if we were if we would take a look at the letter "U," or see the letter "V," your doorway would be at the bottom part of the letter and the show cases would be at the sides of the letter, is that correct? 
Mr. BREWER - Yes. 
Mr. BELIN - What you call this lobby, that is the area between the sidewalk and your front door, is that correct? 
Mr. BREWER - Yes, sir. 
Mr. BELIN - All right, you saw a man going into what you referred to as this lobby area? 
Mr. BREWER - Yes; and he stood there with his back to the street. 
Mr. BELIN - When did he go in now? What did you hear at the time that he stepped into this lobby area? 
Mr. BREWER - I heard the police cars coming up Jefferson, and he stepped in, and the police made a U-turn and went back down East Jefferson. 
Mr. BELIN - Where did he make the U-turn? 
Mr. BREWER - At Zangs. 
Mr. BELIN - Do you remember the sirens going away? 
Mr. BREWER - Yes; the sirens were going away. I presume back to where the officer had been shot, because it was back down that way. And when they turned and left, Oswald looked over his shoulder and turned around and walked up West Jefferson towards the theatre. 
Mr. BELIN - Let me hold you a minute. You used the word Oswald. Did you know who the man was at the time you saw him? 
Mr. BREWER - No. 
Mr. BELIN - So at the time, you didn't know what his name was? 
Mr. BREWER - No. 
Mr. BELIN - Will you describe the man you saw? 
Mr. BREWER - He was a little man, about 5'9", and weighed about 150 pounds is all. 
Mr. BELIN - How tall are you, by the way? 
Mr. BREWER - Six three. 
Mr. BELIN - So you say he was about 5'9"? 
Mr. BREWER - About 5'9". 
Mr. BELIN - And about 150? 
Mr. BREWER - And had brown hair. He had a brown sports shirt on. His shirt tail was out. 
Mr. BELIN - Any jacket? 
Mr. BREWER - No. 
Mr. BELIN - What color of trousers, do you remember? 
Mr. BREWER - I don't remember. 
Mr. BELIN - Light or dark? 
Mr. BREWER - I don't remember that either. 
Mr. BELIN - Any other clothing that you noticed? 
Mr. BREWER - He had a T-shirt underneath his shirt. 
Mr. BELIN - Was his shirt buttoned up all the way? 
Mr. BREWER - A couple of buttons were unbuttoned at the time. 
Mr. BELIN - Light complexioned or dark? 
Mr. BREWER - Light complexioned. 


What was that radio broadcast description again?

Dispatcher (HULSE and MC DANIEL) Have information a suspect just went in the Texas Theatre on West Jefferson.
Supposed to be hiding in the balcony.  

Black guy? White guy? Armed? Clothed? 
Such a lousy description can only be from Postal and because she never questioned Brewer, and never saw the "sneaker" till after he was brought out. With such a lousy description how does this make a sneaker into a cop killer... well, we know how it all turned out.

Even Gerald Hill asks a pertinent question:

550/2 (Sergeant G. HILL) Do you have any additional information on this Oak Cliff suspect?

(HULSE and MC DANIEL). They think he is at the Texas Theatre,
550/2 (Sergeant G. HILL). 10-4.
(HULSE and MC DANIEL) In the balcony. 

OH PLEASE!!!!!!! That is the description? Piss poor work by dispatch on such an important call!!!!
A "suspect in the balcony" doesn't fit Oswald's description. 

Can anyone show where Oswald admitted to this heinous crime of 'sneaking an entering'. What interrogation techniques did they use?
What was Lee's alibi, popcorn half eaten.
Sure wasn't going to buy a soda...I mean what would be the odds!
Cheers, Ed

Oh Brewer said WE were listening to the radio, not I was listening, which is why later he concocted the IBM friends whom to this day wish special anonymity  ... next it'll be the IBM friends whom called it in.  Rolling Eyes
Cheers, Ed
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Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Wed 23 May 2018, 4:20 pm
. next it'll be the IBM friends whom called it in.

Ha ha ha ha


Btw Evan Marshall posted at EF that
“ in 1970 when I graduated from the police academy I found some officers would stop at a phone booth and place a phony hot call to give them an excuse to get inside a place that would be difficult to justify entry otherwise such as motorcycle gang houses and other illegal sites.”
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Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Wed 23 May 2018, 4:58 pm
Now what about the Tippit suspect, what was broadcast?

221 (SUMMERS) - Might,. can give you some additional information. I got an eyeball witness to the got-away man; that suspect in this shooting. He is a white male, 27, 5'11", 165, black wavy hair, fair complected, wearing light gray Eisenhower-type jacket, dark trousers and a white 'shirt and but last seen running on the north side of the street from Patton on Jefferson; on East Jefferson, and was apparently armed with a .32, dark finish, automatic pistol which he had in his right hand.

Now that is a description! 
Not a suspect (male ... female?), in a balcony. 
Smidge ridiculous? 

Hot Call is exactly what we had! Thx for that!

Nick McDonald before heading into the theater was heading into the Abundant Life Temple.
Good place for a tip?

Cheers, Ed
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Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Thu 24 May 2018, 3:41 am
Mick I guess I should post the theater paper you had me write up. The questions from a movie house arrest, and concerns about a planted pistol. The reason we're here.

Truth and the Texas Theater - May 12 2018,

When police were called to the Texas Theater there was a description was of a man sneaking into the theater with a shotgun.
This was broadcast by the Dallas Police Department dispatcher. 
Why else would police descend upon the TT in such force? Dozens of armed cops for a kid sneaking into the balcony? 
So,,,Whom gave Julia Postal this description? Since she claims not to have actually seen the individual who Brewer asked her about.
Brewer claims he is responsible for that description since he followed the person from down the street. Wouldn't Julia tell police this? That another person saw this 'suspect' and can give details.
Surely she did not tell them she had seen the person, so she had to rely on Brewer for this. Yet where did a shotgun get introduced if not by Postal. 
Why did Brewer seem to be anonymous.
Officer McDonald writes a article under his own name, and other news articles also claim the person whom pointed out Lee Oswald was an man seated in the theater. Not one Johnny Calvin Brewer whom claimed to know McDonald. 
Why the time lag?
If Brewer follows a man to the theater from the shoe store and asked Postal about it why does it take so long to phone the cops.
Perhaps to consult her manager.
If some one came in and did not stop at that time and buy a ticket, several possibilities exist.
1) They purchased one earlier 
2) They left the theater but soon returned to retrieve an item/person
3) They were to pick up a person/child
4) No one was in the ticket booth.
5) Just needed popcorn
Or 
They had season tickets… just a joke but shows how many reasons there can be to not “purchase” a movie ticket. 
And Postal admits to leaving the booth.
So does she go and speak with her manager, who is that?
Besides this, Butch Burroughs would be the gate keeper.
He would 'take' the tickets, sell the concessions and watch the lobby.
His take on this was that Lee had been there for start of movie and Butch sold him popcorn.
Over two hours later after his arrest it is claimed Lee had five live bullets and a bus transfer in his pockets… how are we to know this sloppy police work didn’t miss or drop a small movie house ticket stub during either one of Lee's four searches ?
Lee is NEVER asked about this “crime.” 
Theft (obtaining goods or services without paying). Theft regardless of how little the amount is a first degree misdemeanor. But here no charge added for sneaking in the theater. 

Several injured police officers during an arrest usually come with added charges, 

“I started running, and Lyons fell -- he sprained his ankle” – Bob Carroll
“I came over the backs of seats, twisting my right ankle between two of them." - Paul Bentley

...be they self inflicted or not.

Also no charge for assault of a police officer, isn’t Nick McDonald’s claim to be taken seriously?
A scratch is a scratch, a nick on Nick.
Wait what was Nick doing about the president being shot...oh well never mind.
Nick's story skips to the call at 1:30 but he is already going to Oak Cliff when he gets this call to check alleys.
Then he is going after a suspect in the Library, nope, the Balcony of the Texas Theater! 
Skip to the curtain call for the stranger, unidentified stranger.
A man sitting in the front rows (near the front) tips him off that the guy they want is back there.
So then Nick shakes down two other movie patrons, which are not identified, better safe than sorry I guess.
And then finally goes to where a cop killer or president killer, or even a man with a shotgun per the call to police, is seated.

Never mind the fist to Nick's face, where he supposedly got his nick.
Never mind the dented primer, and snap of the weapon, they are going to change to the web of Nick's hand, well exactly who's hand(?) is disputed, and the bullet and another of the other brand go to FBI and are inspected seeing a microscopic defect in the area of one of these two bullets, the claim is it was the bullet that confused Nick into thinking he had been shot at and the gun misfires.
Nope not a misfire says FBI.
Nick changes his tune to getting hand on cylider so it cant fire or web of hand in the hammers path, thus another nick on Nick... poor nicked up Nick.
Too bad the other officers state to hearing a snap, snap of a pistol. 
Can't hear a pistol snap its hammer on a cartridge with flesh in the way. Oops.
If the Texas Theater story held any water Lee would be charged with attempted murder of McDonald. 
And McDonald could testify to that effect.
But that never happened. 
Because these stories are fabrications of the truth.
If a charge wasn’t leveled at Oswald for resisting and for attempting murder of McDonald then one must discount the theatrics. 
A list of witnesses was not kept, or if made,,, made to vanish, Postal claims 24 tickets sold but only 3 witnesses are interviewed, give statements, or can be found.
A group of teens in the balcony are not vocal about their brush with history so are not available to give their details. 
Applin is one witness, he gives accounts that do not support the story told by police.
Mr. APPLIN. I guess it was Oswald, because -- for one reason, that he had on a short sleeve shirt, and I seen a man's arm that was connected to the gun

Oswald wore a long sleeve shirt.
The End.
Cheers , Ed
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Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Thu 24 May 2018, 4:33 am
Another account from Ron Reiland that the suspect in the TT had entered with a shotgun.

https://youtu.be/OGD_bPvbEMs

I have to question Brewer's account, sounds like he watched the suspect leave his doorway, so Brewer steps outside to see where he goes. He sees the suspect down by the theater. He goes to lock the door and when he looks back the suspect is gone.
Brewer goes to see if Julia perhaps sold this suspect a ticket, to see if he'd entered the theater.
Julia says no.
But did she see a person, a suspect or did she see a person approaching the theater, "out of the corner of my eye" and as she exits the booth this person takes the corridor to the alley, this as Brewer locks up... or asks the IBM friends to leave, or locks them in the shoe store. So neither Brewer or Postal know where exactly a person in the area went, did they just assume the subject took to the theater.

Likely this suspect took the corridor between theater and the next business, easily disappeared back to the alley



Cheers, Ed
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Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Thu 24 May 2018, 8:09 am
Ed. Ledoux wrote:Mick I guess I should post the theater paper you had me write up. The questions from a movie house arrest, and concerns about a planted pistol. The reason we're here.

Truth and the Texas Theater - May 12 2018,

When police were called to the Texas Theater there was a description was of a man sneaking into the theater with a shotgun.
This was broadcast by the Dallas Police Department dispatcher. 
Why else would police descend upon the TT in such force? Dozens of armed cops for a kid sneaking into the balcony? 
So,,,Whom gave Julia Postal this description? Since she claims not to have actually seen the individual who Brewer asked her about.
Brewer claims he is responsible for that description since he followed the person from down the street. Wouldn't Julia tell police this? That another person saw this 'suspect' and can give details.
Surely she did not tell them she had seen the person, so she had to rely on Brewer for this. Yet where did a shotgun get introduced if not by Postal. 
Why did Brewer seem to be anonymous.
Officer McDonald writes a article under his own name, and other news articles also claim the person whom pointed out Lee Oswald was an man seated in the theater. Not one Johnny Calvin Brewer whom claimed to know McDonald. 
Why the time lag?
If Brewer follows a man to the theater from the shoe store and asked Postal about it why does it take so long to phone the cops.
Perhaps to consult her manager.
If some one came in and did not stop at that time and buy a ticket, several possibilities exist.
1) They purchased one earlier 
2) They left the theater but soon returned to retrieve an item/person
3) They were to pick up a person/child
4) No one was in the ticket booth.
5) Just needed popcorn
Or 
They had season tickets… just a joke but shows how many reasons there can be to not “purchase” a movie ticket. 
And Postal admits to leaving the booth.
So does she go and speak with her manager, who is that?
Besides this, Butch Burroughs would be the gate keeper.
He would 'take' the tickets, sell the concessions and watch the lobby.
His take on this was that Lee had been there for start of movie and Butch sold him popcorn.
Over two hours later after his arrest it is claimed Lee had five live bullets and a bus transfer in his pockets… how are we to know this sloppy police work didn’t miss or drop a small movie house ticket stub during either one of Lee's four searches ?
Lee is NEVER asked about this “crime.” 
Theft (obtaining goods or services without paying). Theft regardless of how little the amount is a first degree misdemeanor. But here no charge added for sneaking in the theater. 

Several injured police officers during an arrest usually come with added charges, 

“I started running, and Lyons fell -- he sprained his ankle” – Bob Carroll
“I came over the backs of seats, twisting my right ankle between two of them." - Paul Bentley

...be they self inflicted or not.

Also no charge for assault of a police officer, isn’t Nick McDonald’s claim to be taken seriously?
A scratch is a scratch, a nick on Nick.
Wait what was Nick doing about the president being shot...oh well never mind.
Nick's story skips to the call at 1:30 but he is already going to Oak Cliff when he gets this call to check alleys.
Then he is going after a suspect in the Library, nope, the Balcony of the Texas Theater! 
Skip to the curtain call for the stranger, unidentified stranger.
A man sitting in the front rows (near the front) tips him off that the guy they want is back there.
So then Nick shakes down two other movie patrons, which are not identified, better safe than sorry I guess.
And then finally goes to where a cop killer or president killer, or even a man with a shotgun per the call to police, is seated.

Never mind the fist to Nick's face, where he supposedly got his nick.
Never mind the dented primer, and snap of the weapon, they are going to change to the web of Nick's hand, well exactly who's hand(?) is disputed, and the bullet and another of the other brand go to FBI and are inspected seeing a microscopic defect in the area of one of these two bullets, the claim is it was the bullet that confused Nick into thinking he had been shot at and the gun misfires.
Nope not a misfire says FBI.
Nick changes his tune to getting hand on cylider so it cant fire or web of hand in the hammers path, thus another nick on Nick... poor nicked up Nick.
Too bad the other officers state to hearing a snap, snap of a pistol. 
Can't hear a pistol snap its hammer on a cartridge with flesh in the way. Oops.
If the Texas Theater story held any water Lee would be charged with attempted murder of McDonald. 
And McDonald could testify to that effect.
But that never happened. 
Because these stories are fabrications of the truth.
If a charge wasn’t leveled at Oswald for resisting and for attempting murder of McDonald then one must discount the theatrics. 
A list of witnesses was not kept, or if made,,, made to vanish, Postal claims 24 tickets sold but only 3 witnesses are interviewed, give statements, or can be found.
A group of teens in the balcony are not vocal about their brush with history so are not available to give their details. 
Applin is one witness, he gives accounts that do not support the story told by police.
Mr. APPLIN. I guess it was Oswald, because -- for one reason, that he had on a short sleeve shirt, and I seen a man's arm that was connected to the gun

Oswald wore a long sleeve shirt.
The End.
Cheers , Ed
Cheers Ed,


If the Texas Theater story held any water Lee would be charged with attempted murder of McDonald. 
And McDonald could testify to that effect.
But that never happened. 
Because these stories are fabrications of the truth.
If a charge wasn’t leveled at Oswald for resisting and for attempting murder of McDonald then one must discount the theatrics. 
A list of witnesses was not kept, or if made,,, made to vanish, Postal claims 24 tickets sold but only 3 witnesses are interviewed, give statements, or can be found.
A group of teens in the balcony are not vocal about their brush with history so are not available to give their details. 
Applin is one witness, he gives accounts that do not support the story told by police.
Mr. APPLIN. I guess it was Oswald, because -- for one reason, that he had on a short sleeve shirt, and I seen a man's arm that was connected to the gun

Oswald wore a long sleeve shirt.



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Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Thu 24 May 2018, 8:14 am
Ed. Ledoux wrote:Another account from Ron Reiland that the suspect in the TT had entered with a shotgun.

https://youtu.be/OGD_bPvbEMs

I have to question Brewer's account, sounds like he watched the suspect leave his doorway, so Brewer steps outside to see where he goes. He sees the suspect down by the theater. He goes to lock the door and when he looks back the suspect is gone.
Brewer goes to see if Julia perhaps sold this suspect a ticket, to see if he'd entered the theater.
Julia says no.
But did she see a person, a suspect or did she see a person approaching the theater, "out of the corner of my eye" and as she exits the booth this person takes the corridor to the alley, this as Brewer locks up... or asks the IBM friends to leave, or locks them in the shoe store. So neither Brewer or Postal know where exactly a person in the area went, did they just assume the subject took to the theater.

Likely this suspect took the corridor between theater and the next business, easily disappeared back to the alley



Cheers, Ed
Would explain why McDonald pats down two or three others before getting to the cop killer?

Nobody really saw Lee Oswald go into the theatre, Brewer may have seen somebody - not Oswald 
Postal, nah she saw zero.
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Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Fri 25 May 2018, 3:38 pm
Alleyway behind theater.



Last edited by Ed. Ledoux on Fri 25 May 2018, 3:57 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Fri 25 May 2018, 3:45 pm
To clear up any confusion, the curtains separate the lobby and theater, somewhere else it was posited that was the balcony.


as seen in the diagram the balcony covers a good portion of the main floor.
It covers the area where Lee was seated.
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Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Fri 25 May 2018, 3:54 pm
Burroghs would need spider senses to know if someone came in or went out...


Balcony right this way
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Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Fri 25 May 2018, 6:14 pm
"...Reuben White was the projectionist at the Texas theater the day Oswald was arrested there." http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/2893/comments

James B,
Yes. My dad Reuben primarily worked at the Hampton Rd. Drive In, but also worked two days a week at the Texas Theater. He was there when they arrested Oswald.
John passed away in 1992 and my dad died in 1984.


Zionscamp commented about Heights Theater on Jun 11, 2009 at 12:35 pm
I went to many “Kid Shows” there on Saturday mornings during 1950’s.and 1960’s. My friends from Margaret B. Henderson Elementary School would meet there and see such movies as “Beast from 20,000 Fathoms”, and “House on Haunted Hill.” My brother John White worked there as a projectionist on his days off from working at the Wynnewood theater.


Zionscamp commented about Texas Theatre on Jun 11, 2009 at 12:26 pm
My father Reuben White was the projectionist at the Texas theater the day Oswald was arrested there.


Zionscamp commented about Wynnewood Theater on Jun 11, 2009 at 12:16 pm
My brother John White was the projectionist at the Wynnewood form 1965 until 1980. I have such great memories of the theater, including my first date in 1966.



Oswald at the Movies before 1:15
3 posts by 2 authors
 

 



dcwi...@netscape.net



2/14/01

Applin's Testimony Re-evaluated: Oswald in the Theatre before 1:15
With the help of the Warren Commission testimony of ticket-taker Mrs Julia
Postal & an FBI interview of witness George Applin, Jr., the time of Lee
Harvey Oswald's entry into the Texas Theatre has been estimated at 1:36pm.
(With Malice p386)  Mrs Postal said that "all chaos broke loose" & police
cars began screaming up & down Jefferson Avenue, just after a 1:33
announcement of JFK's death (WM p616), & just before Oswald snuck into the
theatre behind her back. (Hearings v7p9)
Meanwhile, on the Applin front, Dale Myers used the latter's FBI interview
to demolish fellow witness Jack Davis's insistence that he saw Oswald
enter the theatre shortly after 1pm.  Davis had "recalled seeing the
opening credits of the feature film a few 'minutes past the 1pm starting
time'.  Shortly thereafter, a man [later identified as Oswald] came in &
sat next to him...." (p617)  But Applin stated that "the show began 'at
approximately 1:00pm' with a cartoon & a newsreel... the feature did not
begin until 'approximately 20 minutes later'." (WM p617)
Myers added that "newspaper ads confirm a 1:20pm start time for the
feature, War Is Hell." (p617)  It would certainly seem, then, that Davis
was in error--that the movie could not have started before 1:20, & thus
Oswald could not have sat down near him before 1:20....
Mrs Postal testified that the theatre opened that day at 12:45 (v7p9), &
Applin's WC testimony seems to support her:  "I was over in Oak Cliff,
around about, I guess, about 12 o'clock, I imagine is what time it was.  
I was there & the show hadn't opened up, so I was sitting in my car
listening to the radio up until the time that the show opened." (v7p87)  
Killing time for 45 minutes....
But, first, note Applin's arrival time: about 12:00.  Next, note that
concessionaire Warren "Butch" Burroughs said that he "went to work at 12"
that day. (v7p15)  Noon is going to become a key time here.... Running
times of movies are going to be critical, too.
Thirdly, recall Dallas Police Dept. Detective John B. Toney's 12/3/63
report in which he found a "young man sitting near the top of the stairs
[in the Texas Theatre balcony]":  "We ascertained from manager on duty
that this subject had been in the theatre since about 12:05pm." (CE 2003
p98, WM p171)  And the manager, John Callahan, was in a position to know
when patrons had first arrived, because (as Mrs Postal testified) "my
employer had stayed & took the tickets because we change pictures on
Thursday...." (v7p10)
Callahan's "12:05"--how can that be?  The doors--Mrs Postal testified--did
not open until 12:45.  How could patrons have been in the theatre at noon?  
Let's look, now, at another piece of Applin testimony, his 12/1/63
affidavit for the Secret Service: "At approximately 12:45pm on Nov. 22,
1963, I entered the Texas Theater on Jefferson Avenue in Dallas.  At about
1:45pm, during the introduction of the next movie, the house lights in the
theater came on.... Just after the lights came on, I noticed a police
officer near the front of the theater.... I then noticed another officer
coming down the middle aisle...." (WM p558)
But wasn't "War Is Hell" supposed to have started--according to Applin,
elsewhere--at 1:20?  Police officers indeed arrived at the theatre at
1:47, & the lights were turned on about 1:49 (WM p387).  And Applin's 1:45
movie was indeed "War Is Hell":  "Audie Murphy introduced the picture...
the lights came on." (v7p87)  (Murphy in fact introduced "War Is Hell"
[Maltin, Movie & Video Guide, 1992].)  Was the first feature perhaps just
starting late?  Apparently, the feature in question was--but why?  No
witness ever suggested problems with either the projector or the
projectionist.  Why then was the starting time delayed?  For the SS,
Applin pinpointed that time by synching it with an event with a verifiable
time--when the "house lights came on"; his FBI estimate was only an
unsynched time approximation.
Curiously, Applin--in his SS affidavit--further specified that the
Murphy-introduced movie was the "NEXT movie."  But that sounds a little
crazy.  Is Applin here saying that there was a movie *before* "War Is
Hell."  How could a feature-length film have been squeezed into the space
between 1:00, or 1:20, & 1:45?
Pretty clearly, it wasn't.  In his SS affidavit, Applin specified the time
that "War Is Hell" started as 1:45, while Callahan told police that at
least one patron had been in the theatre since 12:05.  That's 100 minutes.  
What might have fit such a time slot?  What might account for the
100-minute gap?  Most everyone knows that there was a co-feature that day,
the Van Heflin "Cry of Battle."  Not as well known: its running time--99
minutes (Martin, Video Movie Guide 1999).  A perfect fit.  "War Is Hell"
was indeed, then, the *second* movie that day, as Applin notes; "Cry of
Battle" was first.  It started at 12:05; it ended about 1:45.
The Texas Theatre opened for business, then--despite everything you've
read--about noon, on Friday, Nov. 22, 1963.  "Cry of Battle" started at
12:05.  The newspaper listed "War Is Hell" as starting at 1:20.  But
recall that Mrs Postal said that the Texas changed programs on
Thursday--as with most theatres, its new program began on Friday, &
management apparently guessed (incorrectly) that "Cry of Battle" was about
80 minutes long.  ("War Is Hell" was in fact 81 minutes [Scheuer, Movies
on TV, 1992].)

Why, then, did Mrs Postal testify that they hadn't opened until 12:45?  
Why did Applin testify, in one place, that the first feature began as late
as 1:20, when he knew that it must have begun 75 minutes earlier?--he was,
he says, in the vicinity at noon.  Why--in other words--did someone want
to have witnesses push back the box-office start time for 11/22?  Why did
someone, it seems, want to discredit witnesses like Davis & Burroughs,
who, yes, also has said that Oswald entered the theatre "shortly after
1:00pm" (WM p617)?
This is a critical half hour, of course, the 30 minutes between the
Davis-Burrough 1:05 (or so) & the Postal 1:35 (or so):  Officer Tippit was
shot about 1:15 (WM p382).  If Davis & Burroughs are right, Oswald could
not have shot Tippit.  And, although they are not necessarily right, the
misguided effort to make them *look* wrong lends credence to their story.  
And note that cab driver William Whaley testified that he dropped Oswald
off about 12:52, & last saw him not far from--& walking in the direction
of--the theatre (CE 2003 p64).  That would put him inside the theatre
"shortly after 1:00."
Again, why did Mrs Postal testify that the theatre didn't open until
12:45?  That's not just a fluke of memory, as the time recollections of
Applin, Davis, & Burroughs might have been.  She said, in full, "We open
daily at 12:45, sometimes maybe 5, 4 minutes later or something, but that
is our regular hours." (v7p9)  Whatever the "regular hours," the theatre
opened about noon that particular Friday--maybe as the result of a
last-minute decision to provide an alternative to the motorcade on that
irregular day....
And why did Applin change his testimony re the movie start time--"c1:45"
for the SS, "c1:20" for the FBI?  Why does it seem that someone was
tampering with these two witnesses (Mrs Postal & Applin) to make it seem
as if Oswald could not possibly have entered the theatre before 1:20?  
Because, of course, a "1:20" scenario ensures that Oswald had enough time
to shoot Tippit & get to the theatre....
Where, before, the time window within which Oswald could have entered the
theatre seemed, roughly, 1:20 to 1:40, the window, now, has widened
somewhat, to something like, roughly, 1:00 to 1:40.
Donald Willis
























JoeZ1...@aol.com



2/15/01


wrote in message
news:96fde902s2r@drn.newsguy.com...
- show quoted text -
The workers arrive before the theatre opens. There is stuff to do.


>
> Thirdly, recall Dallas Police Dept. Detective John B. Toney's 12/3/63
> report in which he found a "young man sitting near the top of the stairs
> [in the Texas Theatre balcony]":  "We ascertained from manager on duty
> that this subject had been in the theatre since about 12:05pm." (CE 2003
> p98, WM p171)  And the manager, John Callahan, was in a position to know
> when patrons had first arrived, because (as Mrs Postal testified) "my
> employer had stayed & took the tickets because we change pictures on
> Thursday...." (v7p10)
>
> Callahan's "12:05"--how can that be?  The doors--Mrs Postal testified--did
> not open until 12:45.  How could patrons have been in the theatre at noon?
Maybe they weren't. You are quoting from one FBI interview and quoting it
as if it was gospel. It doesn't work that way.



> Let's look, now, at another piece of Applin testimony, his 12/1/63
> affidavit for the Secret Service: "At approximately 12:45pm on Nov. 22,
> 1963, I entered the Texas Theater on Jefferson Avenue in Dallas.  At about
> 1:45pm, during the introduction of the next movie, the house lights in the
> theater came on.... Just after the lights came on, I noticed a police
> officer near the front of the theater.... I then noticed another officer
> coming down the middle aisle...." (WM p558)
>
> But wasn't "War Is Hell" supposed to have started--according to Applin,
> elsewhere--at 1:20?
Yes. So why do you believe this Applin statement instead of the other one?


>Police officers indeed arrived at the theatre at
> 1:47, & the lights were turned on about 1:49 (WM p387).  And Applin's 1:45
> movie was indeed "War Is Hell":  "Audie Murphy introduced the picture...
> the lights came on." (v7p87)  (Murphy in fact introduced "War Is Hell"
> [Maltin, Movie & Video Guide, 1992].)  Was the first feature perhaps just
> starting late?  Apparently, the feature in question was--but why?  No
> witness ever suggested problems with either the projector or the
> projectionist.  Why then was the starting time delayed?
Who said it was?


>For the SS,
> Applin pinpointed that time by synching it with an event with a verifiable
> time--when the "house lights came on"; his FBI estimate was only an
> unsynched time approximation.
So Applin's time becomes gospel, is that how it works?

>
> Curiously, Applin--in his SS affidavit--further specified that the
> Murphy-introduced movie was the "NEXT movie."  But that sounds a little
> crazy.  Is Applin here saying that there was a movie *before* "War Is
> Hell."  How could a feature-length film have been squeezed into the space
> between 1:00, or 1:20, & 1:45?
>
> Pretty clearly, it wasn't.  In his SS affidavit, Applin specified the time
> that "War Is Hell" started as 1:45, while Callahan told police that at
> least one patron had been in the theatre since 12:05.  That's 100 minutes.
> What might have fit such a time slot?  What might account for the
> 100-minute gap?  Most everyone knows that there was a co-feature that day,
> the Van Heflin "Cry of Battle."  Not as well known: its running time--99
> minutes (Martin, Video Movie Guide 1999).  A perfect fit.  "War Is Hell"
> was indeed, then, the *second* movie that day, as Applin notes; "Cry of
> Battle" was first.  It started at 12:05; it ended about 1:45.
So the newpaper time of 1:20 is totally wrong? Why trust eyewitness
testimony? The manager of the theatre wouldn't keep his job for long if he
kept making mistakes like these, would he? Why don't Postal and Burroughs
recall some irate patrons demanding their money back because they showed
up at 1:15 for a 1:20 movie, only to find it wouldn't start for another
half hour?


>
> The Texas Theatre opened for business, then--despite everything you've
> read--about noon, on Friday, Nov. 22, 1963.
Sure. Whatever you say.


>  "Cry of Battle" started at
> 12:05.  The newspaper listed "War Is Hell" as starting at 1:20.  But
> recall that Mrs Postal said that the Texas changed programs on
> Thursday--as with most theatres, its new program began on Friday, &
> management apparently guessed (incorrectly) that "Cry of Battle" was about
> 80 minutes long.  ("War Is Hell" was in fact 81 minutes [Scheuer, Movies
> on TV, 1992].)
You don't guess at these things. The accurate times are necessary to
compute the running times of the shows and to get the schedule for the
entire day correct. If a movie runs five minutes longer than scheduled,
and is shown 6 times throughout the day, you've got an extra half hour of
overtime you're paying everybody by the end of the day. Not to mention a
lot of irate customers. The newspaper times are pretty close to accurate.
Live with it.
- show quoted text -
























dcwi...@netscape.net



2/16/01

In article <3a8c...@mcadams.posc.mu.edu>, JoeZ1...@AOL.COM says...
- hide quoted text -

>
> wrote in message
>news:96fde902s2r@drn.newsguy.com...
>> Applin's Testimony Re-evaluated: Oswald in the Theatre before 1:15
>>
>> With the help of the Warren Commission testimony of ticket-taker Mrs Julia
>> Postal & an FBI interview of witness George Applin, Jr., the time of Lee
>> Harvey Oswald's entry into the Texas Theatre has been estimated at 1:36pm.
>> (With Malice p386)  Mrs Postal said that "all chaos broke loose" & police
>> cars began screaming up & down Jefferson Avenue, just after a 1:33
>> announcement of JFK's death (WM p616), & just before Oswald snuck into the
>> theatre behind her back. (Hearings v7p9)
>>
>> Meanwhile, on the Applin front, Dale Myers used the latter's FBI interview
>> to demolish fellow witness Jack Davis's insistence that he saw Oswald
>> enter the theatre shortly after 1pm.  Davis had "recalled seeing the
>> opening credits of the feature film a few 'minutes past the 1pm starting
>> time'.  Shortly thereafter, a man [later identified as Oswald] came in &
>> sat next to him...." (p617)  But Applin stated that "the show began 'at
>> approximately 1:00pm' with a cartoon & a newsreel... the feature did not
>> begin until 'approximately 20 minutes later'." (WM p617)
>>
>> Myers added that "newspaper ads confirm a 1:20pm start time for the
>> feature, War Is Hell." (p617)  It would certainly seem, then, that Davis
>> was in error--that the movie could not have started before 1:20, & thus
>> Oswald could not have sat down near him before 1:20....
>>
>> Mrs Postal testified that the theatre opened that day at 12:45 (v7p9), &
>> Applin's WC testimony seems to support her:  "I was over in Oak Cliff,
>> around about, I guess, about 12 o'clock, I imagine is what time it was.
>> I was there & the show hadn't opened up, so I was sitting in my car
>> listening to the radio up until the time that the show opened." (v7p87)
>> Killing time for 45 minutes....
>>
>> But, first, note Applin's arrival time: about 12:00.  Next, note that
>> concessionaire Warren "Butch" Burroughs said that he "went to work at 12"
>> that day. (v7p15)  Noon is going to become a key time here.... Running
>> times of movies are going to be critical, too.
>
>The workers arrive before the theatre opens. There is stuff to do.
>>>
>> Thirdly, recall Dallas Police Dept. Detective John B. Toney's 12/3/63
>> report in which he found a "young man sitting near the top of the stairs
>> [in the Texas Theatre balcony]":  "We ascertained from manager on duty
>> that this subject had been in the theatre since about 12:05pm." (CE 2003
>> p98, WM p171)  And the manager, John Callahan, was in a position to know
>> when patrons had first arrived, because (as Mrs Postal testified) "my
>> employer had stayed & took the tickets because we change pictures on
>> Thursday...." (v7p10)
>>
>> Callahan's "12:05"--how can that be?  The doors--Mrs Postal testified--did
>> not open until 12:45.  How could patrons have been in the theatre at noon?
>
>Maybe they weren't. You are quoting from one FBI interview and quoting it
>as if it was gospel. It doesn't work that way.
>
>> Let's look, now, at another piece of Applin testimony, his 12/1/63
>> affidavit for the Secret Service: "At approximately 12:45pm on Nov. 22,
>> 1963, I entered the Texas Theater on Jefferson Avenue in Dallas.  At about
>> 1:45pm, during the introduction of the next movie, the house lights in the
>> theater came on.... Just after the lights came on, I noticed a police
>> officer near the front of the theater.... I then noticed another officer
>> coming down the middle aisle...." (WM p558)
>>
>> But wasn't "War Is Hell" supposed to have started--according to Applin,
>> elsewhere--at 1:20?
>
>Yes. So why do you believe this Applin statement instead of the other one?
>
Because, Joe, it tallies with the other evidence here:  A 1:45 start time for
the "next" feature would put the first feature start time at 12:05, a very
precise time that the manager would remember because that's apparently when they
opened.  Why else would he remember "12:05" for one patron?  And "Cry of Battle"
was 99 minutes long.  It fits.  At the other end, Applin pinpoints the turning
on of the house lights as happening "during the introduction of the ****next****
movie...."
A President doesn't visit a city in Texas every day.  More unusual things
occurred 11/22/63 than a change in theatre times....
dw

>
>>Police officers indeed arrived at the theatre at
>> 1:47, & the lights were turned on about 1:49 (WM p387).  And Applin's 1:45
>> movie was indeed "War Is Hell":  "Audie Murphy introduced the picture...
>> the lights came on." (v7p87)  (Murphy in fact introduced "War Is Hell"
>> [Maltin, Movie & Video Guide, 1992].)  Was the first feature perhaps just
>> starting late?  Apparently, the feature in question was--but why?  No
>> witness ever suggested problems with either the projector or the
>> projectionist.  Why then was the starting time delayed?
>
>Who said it was?
>
Applin.

- hide quoted text -
>>For the SS,
>> Applin pinpointed that time by synching it with an event with a verifiable
>> time--when the "house lights came on"; his FBI estimate was only an
>> unsynched time approximation.
>
>So Applin's time becomes gospel, is that how it works?
>>>
>> Curiously, Applin--in his SS affidavit--further specified that the
>> Murphy-introduced movie was the "NEXT movie."  But that sounds a little
>> crazy.  Is Applin here saying that there was a movie *before* "War Is
>> Hell."  How could a feature-length film have been squeezed into the space
>> between 1:00, or 1:20, & 1:45?
>>
>> Pretty clearly, it wasn't.  In his SS affidavit, Applin specified the time
>> that "War Is Hell" started as 1:45, while Callahan told police that at
>> least one patron had been in the theatre since 12:05.  That's 100 minutes.
>> What might have fit such a time slot?  What might account for the
>> 100-minute gap?  Most everyone knows that there was a co-feature that day,
>> the Van Heflin "Cry of Battle."  Not as well known: its running time--99
>> minutes (Martin, Video Movie Guide 1999).  A perfect fit.  "War Is Hell"
>> was indeed, then, the *second* movie that day, as Applin notes; "Cry of
>> Battle" was first.  It started at 12:05; it ended about 1:45.
>
>So the newpaper time of 1:20 is totally wrong? Why trust eyewitness
>testimony? The manager of the theatre wouldn't keep his job for long if he
>kept making mistakes like these, would he? Why don't Postal and Burroughs
>recall some irate patrons demanding their money back because they showed
>up at 1:15 for a 1:20 movie, only to find it wouldn't start for another
>half hour?
>
I think you've got the psychology reversed here--I can see patrons getting a
little upset if they arrived *late*, at 1:20, for a movie which began *earlier*
than scheduled, & in compensation getting tickets to another show, maybe....

>
>>
>> The Texas Theatre opened for business, then--despite everything you've
>> read--about noon, on Friday, Nov. 22, 1963.
>
>Sure. Whatever you say.
>
Thanks.

>>  "Cry of Battle" started at
>> 12:05.  The newspaper listed "War Is Hell" as starting at 1:20.  But
>> recall that Mrs Postal said that the Texas changed programs on
>> Thursday--as with most theatres, its new program began on Friday, &
>> management apparently guessed (incorrectly) that "Cry of Battle" was about
>> 80 minutes long.  ("War Is Hell" was in fact 81 minutes [Scheuer, Movies
>> on TV, 1992].)
>
>You don't guess at these things. The accurate times are necessary to
>compute the running times of the shows and to get the schedule for the
>entire day correct. If a movie runs five minutes longer than scheduled,
>and is shown 6 times throughout the day, you've got an extra half hour of
>overtime you're paying everybody by the end of the day. Not to mention a
>lot of irate customers. The newspaper times are pretty close to accurate.
>Live with it.
>
Apparently, you've never been to a sold-out show at a movie theatre, where
showtimes have to be pushed back, or to a show the 1st day after the new double-
or triple-bill started.... And distributors don't always have the correct
running times of the films they're distributing--as I know from experience (& a
delightful one) as film commissioner at Hedrick Hall, UCLA, in 1968, & from
clocking the running times of many movies I've reviewed....
- hide quoted text -

>>
>> Why, then, did Mrs Postal testify that they hadn't opened until 12:45?
>> Why did Applin testify, in one place, that the first feature began as late
>> as 1:20, when he knew that it must have begun 75 minutes earlier?--he was,
>> he says, in the vicinity at noon.  Why--in other words--did someone want
>> to have witnesses push back the box-office start time for 11/22?  Why did
>> someone, it seems, want to discredit witnesses like Davis & Burroughs,
>> who, yes, also has said that Oswald entered the theatre "shortly after
>> 1:00pm" (WM p617)?
>>
>> This is a critical half hour, of course, the 30 minutes between the
>> Davis-Burrough 1:05 (or so) & the Postal 1:35 (or so):  Officer Tippit was
>> shot about 1:15 (WM p382).  If Davis & Burroughs are right, Oswald could
>> not have shot Tippit.  And, although they are not necessarily right, the
>> misguided effort to make them *look* wrong lends credence to their story.
>> And note that cab driver William Whaley testified that he dropped Oswald
>> off about 12:52, & last saw him not far from--& walking in the direction
>> of--the theatre (CE 2003 p64).  That would put him inside the theatre
>> "shortly after 1:00."
>>
>> Again, why did Mrs Postal testify that the theatre didn't open until
>> 12:45?  That's not just a fluke of memory, as the time recollections of
>> Applin, Davis, & Burroughs might have been.  She said, in full, "We open
>> daily at 12:45, sometimes maybe 5, 4 minutes later or something, but that
>> is our regular hours." (v7p9)  Whatever the "regular hours," the theatre
>> opened about noon that particular Friday--maybe as the result of a
>> last-minute decision to provide an alternative to the motorcade on that
>> irregular day....
>>
>> And why did Applin change his testimony re the movie start time--"c1:45"
>> for the SS, "c1:20" for the FBI?  Why does it seem that someone was
>> tampering with these two witnesses (Mrs Postal & Applin) to make it seem
>> as if Oswald could not possibly have entered the theatre before 1:20?
>> Because, of course, a "1:20" scenario ensures that Oswald had enough time
>> to shoot Tippit & get to the theatre....
>>
>> Where, before, the time window within which Oswald could have entered the
>> theatre seemed, roughly, 1:20 to 1:40, the window, now, has widened
>> somewhat, to something like, roughly, 1:00 to 1:40.
>>
>> Donald Willis

Here are the show times 

Cheers, Ed
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Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Fri 25 May 2018, 6:19 pm
A stellar bit of info,


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Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

on Fri 25 May 2018, 6:24 pm
Brewer Did not actually see the man go into the theater!

WOW!!
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Re: Texas Theatre Theatrics

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