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1963 Student Trip to Cuba pt 1: Martin Nicolous

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1963 Student Trip to Cuba pt 1: Martin Nicolous

Post by greg parker on Thu 17 Jul 2014, 10:42 am

The federal government’s ban on travel to Cuba had put an end to direct flights.  Although Cuba is only 90 miles from Florida, you had to take a detour to get there.  And what a detour!  The student group I joined for the trip, nearly 60 strong, divided in half for the first leg.  Some of us went to Paris, some to London.  We came together in Prague, Czechoslovakia.  There we traveled by bus for a few days in Karlovy Vary (Carlsbad), a spa resort, where we waited for our connecting flight.  Then the long haul:  Prague to Shannon, Ireland, for refueling; back across the Atlantic to Gander, Newfoundland (Canada) for refueling, and then down along the American coast to Havana. We had taken a week and flown 9,500 miles.

The Cuban revolution was then four years in power.  It had begun in 1953, when a group of students outraged by Fulgencio Batista’s military coup of 1952 attacked the Moncada Barracks.  Most were killed, the rest were captured and put on trial.  In a famous four-hour speech at his trial, student leader Fidel Castro outlined a program of wide-ranging political and social reforms.  He was condemned to prison.  Popular agitation forced his release via an amnesty two years later, and Fidel’s small group fled to Mexico, where they trained and organized.  The Argentine doctor, Ernesto “Che” Guevara, joined them there.  They landed in Cuba on the ship Granma in 1956.  Again, most were killed, but a handful survived and began a three-year guerrilla war in the Sierra Maestra mountains, with widespread support in the cities.  In January, 1959, Batista fled, and Fidel’s forces marched into Havana and formed the government.

Full article here and well worth reading http://nicolaus.com/mn/2011/09/cuba-1963/



Last edited by greg parker on Thu 17 Jul 2014, 2:06 pm; edited 1 time in total

_________________
Mixing Pop and Politics he asks me what the use is
I offer him embarrassment and my usual excuses
While looking down the corridor
Out to where the van is waiting
I'm looking for the Great Leap Forward

            Billy Bragg
-----------------------------
 Australians don't mind criminals: It's successful bullshit artists we despise. 
             Lachie Hulme            
-----------------------------
The Cold War ran on bullshit.
              Me

greg parker
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Posts : 3442
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1963 Student Trip to Cuba p t2: Philip Abbott Luce

Post by greg parker on Thu 17 Jul 2014, 12:26 pm

Phillip Abbott Luce died quietly, of natural causes, in December 1998, in his native Springfield, Ohio. He had also lived quietly, at least as far as the wide world could tell, for many years before his death, but his life was not always so. To my generation of ’60s-era Young Americans for Freedom, Phillip Abbott Luce was a hero: a former radical who had twice traveled illegally to Cuba under the auspices of the pro-Red Chinese Progressive Labor Party, who had been indicted and who testified before the House Un-American Activities Committee as a result, and who awoke from his communist daze in 1965 to be born again as an author, lecturer, and organizer against his lost faith. Like many others who later broke with the god of leftism, Luce sought to take some good from his bad experience by telling the truth about it. In The New Left, his first post-communist book, published in 1966, he wrote that he would “feel that the public exposure of my own political aberrations has resulted in something worthwhile” if he succeeded in keeping “one young person from wasting the time that I did in the Communist movement.””

Phillip Luce’s beginnings appear somewhat uncertain. According to the Ohio Department of Health, he turned 63 on his last birthday before he died, having been born October 17, 1935. But three of his books say he was born three years later, in 1938. “Young people feel that anyone over thirty is an enemy,” he wrote in The New Left, so perhaps the birth dates in the books (published between ’65 and ’68) were hedged to keep him within the age limits of his audience’s trust. That would have been fitting in a way — a parting indulgence in characteristic New Left irresponsibility about facts in particular and reality in general. The ease with which the left falls into self-delusion and into deceiving others is a recurring theme in Luce’s post-communist writing. Another is the left’s gross irresponsibility in stirring up trouble, as when it calmly casts whole, huge categories of people — anyone over 30, for instance — as “enemies.””

----

“Heaven forbid,” Luce wrote in The New Left, “that a young person may decide to take a position other than the prevailing middle-of-the-road liberalism, whether on fluoridation or on foreign aid .... In this country, when one voices strong political viewpoints, he is automatically labeled a zealot, a Communist, or a McCarthyite. The era of the 1960s is the era of the nullification of politics.” It was an era of intellectual confusion and timidity in which “most parents pose as liberals, but often act like social conservatives and feel it’s better to remain quiet than to involve yourself.” The “kids”’ reaction was often to take this empty “ism” to its logical, absurd conclusion, as if to say: OK, you want vacuity, we’ll show you the real thing. “Pot, Kama Sutra sex, bennies, and bra-less females,” Luce wrote, “also are expressions of alienation from traditional society.” And also, there was Communism, seeming to offer an outlet that, in stark contrast to liberalism, possessed a clear moral purpose and a firm assurance about its actions and objectives.”

After receiving his Master’s degree, Luce began to participate in the activities of the Communist Party, which he considered “the only organization of any radical significance around.” Soon, however, he found he had fled one set of stultifying conformities for another. In the fall of 1961, he moved to New York and attempted to go to work on a moribund Communist Party monthly literary magazine called Mainstream. He joined other young writers there in an effort to infuse new ideas and youthful energy into the publication. The group set up a meeting to discuss their plans with American Communist Party head Gus Hall in Hall’s top-floor office at Party headquarters in New York.”

“Hall’s office had the warmth of a barren, unheated attic,” Luce recalled. “Empty bookcases lined the walls, and except for a conglomeration of mixed chairs and a desk, the only ornamentation was a blackboard. This blackboard was utilized by the ‘comrades’ whenever they wanted to mention someone’s name without its being recorded by the FBI .... A personification of paranoia! Such blackboards, I later discovered, adorn all of the cubbyhole offices at the CPUSA. Hall’s appearance was as stark as the physical layout. As he leaned back in his chair, his feet on the desk, he constantly fingered a clothespin and certainly resembled Captain Queeg a lot more than Lenin.” Hall, of course, vetoed any notion of new ideas or youthful exuberance for Mainstream.”

But Luce moved on to become editor of Rights, the house organ of the Emergency Civil Liberties Committee, a group founded in 1951 by “old radicals” Corliss Lamont, I.F. Stone, and others. Clark Foreman, its director, Luce wrote, was “always too independent to join the CPUSA.” Luce thought Foreman was “probably the only ‘old’ radical who understood and sympathized with the frustration and impatience of the young radicals.” Luce credited his own “need for independence, which Clark helped instill in me” with leading him later to break with Communism.”

In 1963, Luce led 58 fellow radicals on his first illegal trip to Cuba. When he returned, he was indicted and subpoenaed to appear before the House Un-American Activities Committee. “We literally swaggered into the hearing room,” Luce wrote, “determined to give the Committee a bad time. When asked my name, I sarcastically replied, ‘Phillip Abbott Luce, as in Henry and Clare Boothe.’” A fine joke, effectively conveying the contempt he felt for an established order he had not yet made any serious effort to understand. “I joined Progressive Labor,” Luce wrote, “because I had a vision of the future and a hatred for the present.” The “vision,” apparently, consisted of little more than vindicating and appeasing the hatred. “I felt that perhaps a united Communist venture could oust the present government. I overlooked all that I knew of the history of the Communist movement, the purges, etc., and held to a belief that Progressive Labor was really interested in individual freedom and the betterment of the people."”

Full article here and well worth reading http://www.steelzone.org/articles.php?y=2000

A review of a Dylan bio by PAL in which he discusses the infamous award ceremony in which Dylan made comments about Oswald and dedicated the award to Luce. http://www.unz.org/Pub/AmSpectator-1973jan-00013

By 1969, Luce had hooked up with Ed Butler as "guest speaker" at Butler's anti-Communist seminars. On sale at the seminars (which were targeted to youth) were recordings of Oswald: a Self-Portrait in Red. During the same period, Luce was made head of college services for YAF.


Last edited by greg parker on Thu 17 Jul 2014, 3:25 pm; edited 2 times in total

_________________
Mixing Pop and Politics he asks me what the use is
I offer him embarrassment and my usual excuses
While looking down the corridor
Out to where the van is waiting
I'm looking for the Great Leap Forward

            Billy Bragg
-----------------------------
 Australians don't mind criminals: It's successful bullshit artists we despise. 
             Lachie Hulme            
-----------------------------
The Cold War ran on bullshit.
              Me

greg parker
Admin

Posts : 3442
Join date : 2009-08-21
Age : 58
Location : Orange, NSW, Australia

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1963 Student Trip to Cuba pt 3: Some Fellow Travelers

Post by greg parker on Thu 17 Jul 2014, 2:05 pm

BURTON WOLFE 
In 1963, Wolfe was the publisher of a small-time, muck-raking paper called "The Californian". The money to keep this paper solvent was provided by Lyle Stuart, a New York publisher. The Californian ran numerous stories lambasting HUAC over the hearings held on student/peace activist travel to Cuba between June and August.  By 1968, Wolfe had joined The Satanic Church of Anton LaVey, and it wasn't long before they were business partners. The following year Wolfe provided the introduction in LaVey's "Satanic Bible". In 1974, he authored LaVey's biography. LaVey is regarded by many as having intelligence connections.  Wolfe has also written books on the Hippy movement in San Francisco, and on Hitler. A unionization drive in the newspaper industry during the mid-seventies saw a number of organizers fired. Though it did little to dampen the drive, strikes were avoided for the time being with the help of pro-management pieces put out by Wolfe. These pieces are now considered classics in "anti-labor speak".  By the 1990's, Wolfe was immersed in writing freelance articles for various Libertarian publications.


LYLE STUART 
In 1954, Stuart was the business partner of EC Comics king, William Gaines. Gaines testified that year before the Senate Subcommittee on Juvenile Delinquency in New York City during it's hearings into the effects of comics on youth. Many websites dedicated to the history of comics maintain that the sole aim of the subcommittee was to rid the industry of its market leader. In other words, it was doing what politicians are often best at doing: providing favors to big business - in this case - Gaines competitors. Those hearings were held shortly after Lee Harvey Oswald had spent time in Youth House for delinquency. EC comics did get chopped as a result of the hearings in nn small measure because he appeared before those gentlemen full of "speed" and a speech all provided by the person who had talked him into this suicide mission - Lyle Stuart. By the early sixties, Stuart was one of the leaders of newly formed, Fair Play for Cuba Committee, and though his official ties to it may have been severed by 1963, he was still, nonetheless, publishing literature used by the FPCC such as Corliss Lamont's, The Crime Against Cuba - a booklet Oswald handed out, and on which the address "544 Camp St" had been stamped. The FPCC fell apart in the US after the assassination. It seems Stuart had a knack for proximity to downfalls. In fact, literary hatchet jobs were his specialty in the '40's (he has been called the Kitty Kelley of that decade), and all that may have changed after the '40's was the method...

PAUL/BARRY HOFFMAN 
Both names appear in the literature concerning this trip. It is my best guess that his real name was "Barry" but that he used the name "Paul" on the trip. According to the September 4, 1963 syndicated news column These Days by John Chamberlain, "Barry Hoffman" was a Boston businessman who traveled with the students as a counterspy on behalf of "an American lecturer on extremist movements". Indeed, an FBI cable of the time identifies "Hoffman" as a "source" within the Permanent Student Committee for Travel to Cuba. The same cable stated that he made the trip under the sponsorship of Gordon Hall of Boston. Hall is mentioned in Revilo P Oliver's, "Marxism in Dallas" and Hargis', "The Far Left".  

A bio on Hall at the Hall-Hoag collection held at Brown University states: 

The Hall-Hoag collection, as such, began when Hall returned home from the war and first encountered U.S. domestic hate groups. Appalled by their ideology and beliefs  Hall came to the determination that groups at both the far left and far right of American society were a danger to democracy and good government, and he set out on a plan to combat them. Hall began to infiltrate and investigate these groups and actively collected their printed propaganda  After a few years as an investigator for the Friends of Democracy, an anti-totalitarian group, he was struck out on his own as a freelance researcher. He supported this research by giving public lectures about the dangers posed by radical extremist and hate groups in which he used their propaganda as evidence of their ideology and activities. A firm believer in the Constitutional framework of American governance and the open society it created, Hall took it as his mission to educate ordinary Americans about extremist groups and their activities so they they could make informed decisions about them. Collecting and lecturing on these groups became Gordon Hall’s life work. By the late 1960’s he had recruited a circle of like-minded volunteers to help in his collection efforts.  
http://blogs.brown.edu/hallhoag/gordon-hall-and-grace-hoag/
According to at least one researcher who interviewed him, Hall was in the employ of the FBI. And according to Joan Mellen, Hall was close to a lot of the extremists he was studying, and became aware of a young man named Lee Harvey Oswald through one such relationship with none other than Guy Banister. 
http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.php?showtopic=10074&page=2

NICHOLAS BATESON 
Bateson was quoted in the NYT, October 27, 1963 as saying that he was a "guest member" of the Progressive Labor Movement. The article was headed "2 witnesses Balk Cuba Trip Inquiry". Other fun things Bateson did in 1963 included co-authoring a report titled "An Analysis of Risk Taking in Terms of Power and Comparison Level".  


Abstract : An attempt was made in this paper to account for a person's showing a consistent preference between two gambles that differ in variance (i. e., in degree of riskiness) but have the same expected value (where expected value is defined as the sum of all the possible payoffs from the gamble, each one multiplied by its objective probability of occurrence). Researchers in decision theory, starting from the assumption that the person must be maximizing utility, have advanced two major explanations for such a preference.
http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/AD0608436

_________________
Mixing Pop and Politics he asks me what the use is
I offer him embarrassment and my usual excuses
While looking down the corridor
Out to where the van is waiting
I'm looking for the Great Leap Forward

            Billy Bragg
-----------------------------
 Australians don't mind criminals: It's successful bullshit artists we despise. 
             Lachie Hulme            
-----------------------------
The Cold War ran on bullshit.
              Me

greg parker
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Posts : 3442
Join date : 2009-08-21
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Location : Orange, NSW, Australia

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Re: 1963 Student Trip to Cuba pt 1: Martin Nicolous

Post by Guest on Thu 17 Jul 2014, 3:08 pm

greg parker wrote:

A review of a Dylan bio by PAL in which he discusses the infamous award ceremony in which Dylan made comments about Oswald and dedicated the award to Luce. http://www.unz.org/Pub/AmSpectator-1973jan-00013
I always suspected Dylan may have been stoned when he went up to receive the Tom Paine award.


Last edited by greg parker on Thu 17 Jul 2014, 3:26 pm; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : edited out my stuttering!)

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Re: 1963 Student Trip to Cuba pt 1: Martin Nicolous

Post by greg parker on Thu 17 Jul 2014, 10:19 pm

Paul Klein wrote:
greg parker wrote:

A review of a Dylan bio by PAL in which he discusses the infamous award ceremony in which Dylan made comments about Oswald and dedicated the award to Luce. http://www.unz.org/Pub/AmSpectator-1973jan-00013
I always suspected Dylan may have been stoned when he went up to receive the Tom Paine award.
Paul, who could really tell the difference Question 

On a side note - have been to 3 Dylan concerts. The first and last of them were utter crap; the second was magic.

_________________
Mixing Pop and Politics he asks me what the use is
I offer him embarrassment and my usual excuses
While looking down the corridor
Out to where the van is waiting
I'm looking for the Great Leap Forward

            Billy Bragg
-----------------------------
 Australians don't mind criminals: It's successful bullshit artists we despise. 
             Lachie Hulme            
-----------------------------
The Cold War ran on bullshit.
              Me

greg parker
Admin

Posts : 3442
Join date : 2009-08-21
Age : 58
Location : Orange, NSW, Australia

View user profile http:// http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00IXOA5ZK/ref=s9_simh_

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Re: 1963 Student Trip to Cuba pt 1: Martin Nicolous

Post by Guest on Fri 18 Jul 2014, 5:57 am

greg parker wrote:
Paul Klein wrote:
greg parker wrote:

A review of a Dylan bio by PAL in which he discusses the infamous award ceremony in which Dylan made comments about Oswald and dedicated the award to Luce. http://www.unz.org/Pub/AmSpectator-1973jan-00013
I always suspected Dylan may have been stoned when he went up to receive the Tom Paine award.
Paul, who could really tell the difference Question 

On a side note - have been to 3 Dylan concerts. The first and last of them were utter crap; the second was magic.
I am not sure if you've seen Eat The Document and Don't Look Back, Greg. He is sped up, drunk and stoned throughout. Sometimes all at once. We have proof at least that he was stoned when he got up to blab about something or rather that night. Did you ever read his non apology letter for what he said? Its no more clearer. It can be found here:
http://www.corliss-lamont.org/dylan.htm
I saw Dylan once at the Sydney Entertainment Centre in 2003??. He was crap but I loved it. I was up real close and he looked as cool as fuck being crappy.

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Re: 1963 Student Trip to Cuba pt 1: Martin Nicolous

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