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How the Bullet from the Grassy Knoll Caused a Large Wound in the Back of the Head

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Re: How the Bullet from the Grassy Knoll Caused a Large Wound in the Back of the Head

Post by Guest on Thu 02 Jan 2014, 4:30 pm

Stan Dane wrote:
Traveller11 wrote:One more thing about bullets that dissipate all of their energy upon penetration, they tend to make their targets move backwards in response to being hit.

For example, if you were shot with a FMJ bullet and it passed through you without expanding or breaking up and dissipating most of its energy, you would likely not even move, in response to being shot.

OTOH, if you were shot in the head with a hollow point or fragmenting bullet that came to a full, broken up stop halfway through your skull, you would likely be knocked over.

I have seen a deer, shot in the head with a hollow point bullet, literally lifted off its front hooves by the impact of the bullet.
Have you ever seen or have you experience with a FMJ bullet passing through anything such as a deer and not be damaged or deformed in any way (e.g., like CE 399)?

No, unfortunately, I am too humane and law abiding to have ever used FMJ ammo for hunting, which is universally banned from hunting everywhere in North America simply because it causes so little damage to game animals and tends to leave them wounded.

As I pointed out earlier, 6.5mm Carcano bullets have a copper alloy jacket thicker than other 6.5mm rifles simply because the rifling grooves on the Carcano are deeper than other 6.5mm calibre rifles. This would make for a very strong bullet but, of course, bullets are not magic.

If we look at the x-rays of John B. Connally's forearm, it is possible to see that CE 399 (or another bullet) made a direct hit on the radius bone (the bone on the thumb side of your forearm), striking it on the backside of the forearm, and fracturing it into several fragments.









Even if we take into consideration that the velocity of this bullet had been reduced somewhat, I would still expect to see a certain degree of deformation on CE 399 if it was the bullet that caused this fracture.

What is possible is that a FMJ bullet struck JBC's forearm side on, and not nose first. An examination of JBC's shirt cuff shows a rather long hole in the material, not the neat round hole made from a nose first entry. Supporting this are the tiny fragments of lead visible in the x-ray. FMJ bullets are not really "full" metal jackets, at least not in the majority of cases. The 1 mm thick copper alloy jacket does not cover the base of a 6.5mm Carcano FMJ bullet, leaving exposed lead at the base about 4.5 mm in diameter. This is a holdover from the Hague Peace Conference in which things such as dum dum bullets were banned in an effort to make rifle bullets more "humane" in war time. As the intention of a FMJ bullet is to have it pass through an enemy combatant without it expanding or breaking up, it was necessary to leave the base open as a sort of "pressure relief valve". When a FMJ bullet strikes something hard, it has a tendency to deform, and this often makes the space inside the jacket smaller. If the jacket fully encased the soft lead core, internal pressures could rise to the point where the copper alloy jacket ruptures; effectively making a FMJ bullet into a fragmenting bullet with resulting severe damage to the victim. However, with the open base, internal pressures cause the soft lead core to extrude like toothpaste and shed in flakes. The fragments seen in JBC's wrist are typical of this extrusion process.

As I said a couple of posts back, I still cannot see how a bullet exiting JBC's thorax at the level of his right nipple could have struck the back of JBC's wrist; simply because the forearm cannot rotate to such a position. Better still, if CE 399 struck the back of JBC's right radius bone so squarely, how did this intact bullet then move an inch sideways so that it could pass between the radius and ulna bone and then proceed to JBC's left thigh, first exiting the palm side of JBC's right forearm?

It could be argued that CE 399 actually passed through the radius bone as the x-rays do show what appears to be a complete break in the radius. But, once again, there is the problem with the forearm being incapable of enough rotation to present the back of it to a bullet exiting JBC's thorax. Added to this, the Parkland doctor definitely places the palm side exit wound on JBC's forearm between the two forearm bones.

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Re: How the Bullet from the Grassy Knoll Caused a Large Wound in the Back of the Head

Post by Stan Dane on Thu 02 Jan 2014, 6:31 pm

Traveller11 wrote:Even if we take into consideration that the velocity of this bullet had been reduced somewhat, I would still expect to see a certain degree of deformation on CE 399 if it was the bullet that caused this fracture.
The picture of CE 573 (in Colin's "Walker bullet and NAA" thread) shows a mashed up FMJ bullet. Granted it hit things other than flesh and bone, but it's quite deformed. Like you, I have to believe that for a MC 6.5mm FMJ bullet to do all the physical damage to JKF and JBC that the Warrenistas say it did, it would have been noticeably deformed. Especially if it tumbled.
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Re: How the Bullet from the Grassy Knoll Caused a Large Wound in the Back of the Head

Post by Gerry Simone on Sat 11 Mar 2017, 9:40 am

I was browsing the internet on this subject and came upon this fascinating thread, which led me to register as a member to this forum.  So greetings all.

I've read the first couple of pages of this thread, so forgive me if I'm repeating a point here.

Someone mentioned a shot from the rear at about Z327 (after a shot from the front circa Z313).

It just happens that Tink Thompson mentioned this at the JFK Lancer Conference in 2013, with photographic analysis based on the work of David Wimp IIRC.  He shows that the limo windshield blurs around Z328 (I could be wrong at the Z Frame but that's pretty close) because it BELLOWS from a shot coming from the rear.  We only see this momentarily.  It may be the time that the windshield is struck by a fragment and cracks.  I took a picture of the projection screen of his photo enhancement.

Also a question for Martin Hay on one of his statements:

Where do we see the entrance wound at the EOP on the x-ray?  Are you talking about a bright circle that is roughly 6.5mm in diameter visible in the anterior-posterior view?
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Re: How the Bullet from the Grassy Knoll Caused a Large Wound in the Back of the Head

Post by Mick Purdy on Sat 11 Mar 2017, 5:32 pm

Can I just say for the record, I don't f'ing care about JFK's head wound. 

Someone shot him!

It wasn't Oswald!

Can we move on!

Enough said!

Sorry for my rant.
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Re: How the Bullet from the Grassy Knoll Caused a Large Wound in the Back of the Head

Post by Gerry Simone on Sun 12 Mar 2017, 8:57 am

Mick, you know what they say, "the devil is in the detail".
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Re: How the Bullet from the Grassy Knoll Caused a Large Wound in the Back of the Head

Post by Mick Purdy on Sun 12 Mar 2017, 9:57 am

Gerry Simone wrote:Mick, you know what they say, "the devil is in the detail".
Yeah I know Gerry,

This forum is not short on topics full of new research. Always welcome here is new material, a little moderate speculation and a sprinkle of intuition. Thats why I love this place.
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Re: How the Bullet from the Grassy Knoll Caused a Large Wound in the Back of the Head

Post by Robbert on Sat 18 Mar 2017, 4:52 am

A shooter from the Grassy Knoll hits JFK in the right temple, the right rear of JFK's head has a large gaping wound and the person who seems to have taken the brunt of the ejecta from JFK's gaping rear head wound is motorcycle cop Bobby Hargis, who was riding to the left rear of JFK's limo.

See anything unusual here?

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Re: How the Bullet from the Grassy Knoll Caused a Large Wound in the Back of the Head

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